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Experiments in quantum spins in diamond

I've started to explain some really neat stuff related to how defects in diamonds are being studied currently. I created a new wiki page, Experiments in quantum spins in diamond. There is not much to see there yet, but I hope to fill this out soon.

This is helpful to me as I want to remember what I learned about how these systems work. I think others would be interested as well. Actually, the people here were interested in seeing some cute ways to solve the cubic equation to get the energy levels of the paired electron spins: not so hard but they've been using numerics to do it. There is also a cool relationship to a triangle: adjusting an external field and the symmetry axis of the NV can be related to the length of the triangle edges and to its position. In any case, more to follow but for now there is not much to see.

Cheers!

P.s. I'd put a link next if there was much happening yet, but there's not but here is the url http://www.azimuthproject.org/azimuth/show/Experiments+in+quantum+spins+in+diamond

Comments

  • 1.

    There are some fascinating quantum properties of defects (or vacancies) in the structure of diamonds --- called NV centers.

    This week we have Florian Dolde and Ya Wang visiting us so I'm now remotivated to finish off this NV centers introduction.

    The fun thing found is using the graphical view of the roots of the cubic, related to the magnitude of a static electromagnetic field, and the angle of the symmetry axis relative to this field. In other words, it gives a neat picture of some physical quantities that are important to NV centers!

    Comment Source:There are some fascinating quantum properties of defects (or vacancies) in the structure of diamonds --- called NV centers. This week we have Florian Dolde and Ya Wang visiting us so I'm now remotivated to finish off <a href="http://www.azimuthproject.org/azimuth/show/Experiments+in+quantum+spins+in+diamond">this </a> NV centers introduction. The fun thing found is using the graphical view of the roots of the cubic, related to the magnitude of a static electromagnetic field, and the angle of the symmetry axis relative to this field. In other words, it gives a neat picture of some physical quantities that are important to NV centers!
  • 2.
    The triangle and cubic root animation is fantastic.
    Comment Source:The triangle and cubic root animation is fantastic.
  • 3.

    In principle, we need to make a program so you can put in the machine settings and it spits out the triangle (with the physical roots). As you know, the point is that these roots have physical meaning and in fact, these are what they determine when using an NV as a sensor. The NV guys told me that they like this triangle view point a lot. It's just a cubic, but connecting the geometric picture to physics is pretty fun!

    When I'm further along into the article, I'll as you James to please take a look at the band structure arguments. Clearly I'm sort of out of my depth with most of this stuff. This is actually a good thing in some ways, since it means I have to really think about how to explain it, even to myself :D

    Comment Source:In principle, we need to make a program so you can put in the machine settings and it spits out the triangle (with the physical roots). As you know, the point is that these roots have physical meaning and in fact, these are what they determine when using an NV as a sensor. The NV guys told me that they like this triangle view point a lot. It's just a cubic, but connecting the geometric picture to physics is pretty fun! When I'm further along into the article, I'll as you James to please take a look at the band structure arguments. Clearly I'm sort of out of my depth with most of this stuff. This is actually a good thing in some ways, since it means I have to really think about how to explain it, even to myself :D
  • 4.
    edited June 2014

    This stuff is cool - I just noticed it. I suggest moving it to "Blog articles in progress", finishing it off and letting me publish it. It doesn't need to be perfect or complete, just fun and fairly clear.

    Comment Source:This stuff is cool - I just noticed it. I suggest moving it to "Blog articles in progress", finishing it off and letting me publish it. It doesn't need to be perfect or complete, just fun and fairly clear.
  • 5.

    Oh, OK cool! The really fun part is not there yet!

    Comment Source:Oh, OK cool! The really fun part is not there yet!
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