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The most cost effective way to mitigate global warming

Please join me in the most cost effective means (most by over a factor of 1,000) of mitigating global warming, which is to save tropical rainforest from destruction. (I give some calculations of this further below)

You can save 20 acres of rainforest (which stores about 200 tons of carbon per acre) for a mere 10 dollars via this link:

http://www.rainforesttrust.org/acres-for-50cents/

And until the initial fundraising goal of $646,000, your contributions will be quadrupled because of a 3:1 matching challenge by other supporters.

After giving, you can share with others via these social networking tools:

http://www.rainforesttrust.org/social-media/

If you wish to give by check, please make the check payable to Rainforest Trust (with Sierra del Divisor in the memo or "for" area of the check) and please mail the check to: Rainforest Trust, 25 Horner St., Warrenton, VA 20186.

The Rainforest Trust is a 4 star rated charity (by Charity Navigator) and over 90 percent of all donates go to saving specific rainforest acres (by land purchase or establishment of preserves and parks). 100 percent of donations to the Sierra del Divisor project go to saving acres of rainforest (less a small transaction fee charged by Network for Good for credit card payments).

As a method to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, saving an acre of rainforest for 50 cents is over 1,000 times more cost effective than buying a hybrid or electric car (rather than a conventional gas-powered car) or installing solar panels on your home, each of which cost well over $1,000 and each individually do less to prevent carbon dioxide emissions than saving one acre of rainforest. This 1,000+ ratio holds true in comparison to other alternatives as well.

Here are some interesting bits of information that you may find informative, interesting and/or motivating:

  1. I have much skin in the game: I have funded projects to save over 750,000 acres of rainforest this year, and have committed to fund another 250,000 acres (I will fund the majority of this in 2014).

  2. Much due diligence behind this project: During 2013, I spent many weeks of full time work searching for the most cost effective ways to save rainforest (visiting the Amazon twice and working with many conservation charities) to develop the most cost effective projects to save rainforest. This project is the result, and others will follow. Note that I gobbled up (via donations) all other cost effective projects I could find during 2013, making it necessary to push charities to develop larger projects, such as this one.

  3. I am a fiduciary with respect to this project: I recently joined the Rainforest Trust board.

While I am new to this group, I am very serious about this issue. Since retiring as a venture capitalist last year, I have become aware of the full potential threat of global warming through much study and research, and have become obsessed with pursuing the most cost-effective means to mitigate global warming. You can read a bit more about my background here:

http://www.rainforesttrust.org/about/our-board-of-directors/

Comments

  • 1.

    mitigating global warming, which is to save tropical rainforest from destruction

    I didn't redo your calculation, but even if this is the most cost effective, it's unsure that it will actually help, if all oil and coal reserves are burnt meanwhile.

    Comment Source:> mitigating global warming, which is to save tropical rainforest from destruction I didn't redo your calculation, but even if this is the most cost effective, it's unsure that it will actually help, if all oil and coal reserves are burnt meanwhile.
  • 2.
    edited January 2014

    Brett wrote:

    I have much skin in the game: I have funded projects to save over 750,000 acres of rainforest this year, and have committed to fund another 250,000 acres (I will fund the majority of this in 2014).

    Good!

    1. Much due diligence behind this project: During 2013, I spent many weeks of full time work searching for the most cost effective ways to save rainforest (visiting the Amazon twice and working with many conservation charities) to develop the most cost effective projects to save rainforest. This project is the result, and others will follow. Note that I gobbled up (via donations) all other cost effective projects I could find during 2013, making it necessary to push charities to develop larger projects, such as this one.

    Would you be interested in writing a short blog article about this "due diligence"? Not an appeal for money, but something that describes what you learned about different charities of this sort, and why some are better than others. In other words: useful information, which you have gathered, that other people don't know.

    Frederik wrote:

    but even if this is the most cost effective, it’s unsure that it will actually help, if all oil and coal reserves are burnt meanwhile.

    This can be used as a general argument not to do anything about global warming except exert pressure to keep oil and coal reserves from being burnt. I'm not sure it's a good argument not to do anything, though. We do many things even if we're "unsure" it will actually help.

    There are also good reasons to save tropical rainforest other than preventing global warming. (And in fact I believe it's worth saving even if it's not saved forever, but later falls victim to climate change.)

    There are also reasons to greet a new member of the Azimuth Forum in a somewhat less negative way than you just did, even if you disagree with their approach to solving the global warming problem or feel suspicious about the fact that they're asking for money. We should try to attract energetic people like Brett.

    I'll have to read a bit about how this rain forest is saved. I've fallen behind on giving money to charities, and this might be a good place to give some.

    Comment Source:Brett wrote: > I have much skin in the game: I have funded projects to save over 750,000 acres of rainforest this year, and have committed to fund another 250,000 acres (I will fund the majority of this in 2014). Good! > 2. Much due diligence behind this project: During 2013, I spent many weeks of full time work searching for the most cost effective ways to save rainforest (visiting the Amazon twice and working with many conservation charities) to develop the most cost effective projects to save rainforest. This project is the result, and others will follow. Note that I gobbled up (via donations) all other cost effective projects I could find during 2013, making it necessary to push charities to develop larger projects, such as this one. Would you be interested in writing a short blog article about this "due diligence"? Not an appeal for money, but something that describes what you learned about different charities of this sort, and why some are better than others. In other words: useful information, which you have gathered, that other people don't know. Frederik wrote: > but even if this is the most cost effective, it’s unsure that it will actually help, if all oil and coal reserves are burnt meanwhile. This can be used as a general argument not to do anything about global warming except exert pressure to keep oil and coal reserves from being burnt. I'm not sure it's a good argument not to do anything, though. We do many things even if we're "unsure" it will actually help. There are also good reasons to save tropical rainforest other than preventing global warming. (And in fact I believe it's worth saving even if it's not saved _forever_, but later falls victim to climate change.) There are also reasons to greet a new member of the Azimuth Forum in a somewhat less negative way than you just did, even if you disagree with their approach to solving the global warming problem or feel suspicious about the fact that they're asking for money. We should try to attract energetic people like Brett. I'll have to read a bit about how this rain forest is saved. I've fallen behind on giving money to charities, and this might be a good place to give some.
  • 3.

    This can be used as a general argument not to do anything about global warming except exert pressure to keep oil and coal reserves from being burnt. I’m not sure it’s a good argument not to do anything, though. We do many things even if we’re “unsure” it will actually help.

    Hey, I didn't want to imply we should not do this. I meant that we should not only do this! In the sense, "I've just donated to a reforesting charity so now I don't have to feel guilty and I can do whatever I want"

    Besides, if one fails, it's better to fail while trying. Without any attempt, failure is usually guaranteed.

    Comment Source:> This can be used as a general argument not to do anything about global warming except exert pressure to keep oil and coal reserves from being burnt. I’m not sure it’s a good argument not to do anything, though. We do many things even if we’re “unsure” it will actually help. Hey, I didn't want to imply we should not do this. I meant that we should **not only do this**! In the sense, "I've just donated to a reforesting charity so now I don't have to feel guilty and I can do whatever I want" Besides, if one fails, it's better to fail while trying. Without any attempt, failure is usually guaranteed.
  • 4.

    Besides, despite my skepticism, there's also this link on the Forum about realistic consequences of afforestation. Ironically, the link was by me :)

    Comment Source:Besides, despite my skepticism, there's also this link on the Forum about [realistic consequences of afforestation](http://forum.azimuthproject.org/discussion/721/small-temperature-benefits-provided-by-realistic-afforestation-efforts/?Focus=4594#Comment_4594). Ironically, the link was by me :)
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