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Do governments have the right mix in their energy R&D portfolios?

Started a new page based on a reference that "Thomas" (Thomas Riepe?) added to A Path to Sustainable Energy:

Do governments have the right mix in their energy R&D portfolios ?

Short answer: no, too little invested in efficiency, too much on nuclear.

This reference is not about the Jacobson-Delucchi paper "A Path to Sustainable Energy", so I moved it to Plans of action and then created the above page.

Problem: the title has a question mark in it, but it seems this confuses Instiki, and I mucked about, and now there are two pages titled Do governments have the right mix in their energy R&D portfolios, one with a question mark and one without - but the question mark is invisible in the page title for some reason!

Comments

  • 1.
    edited October 2010

    I've been trying to find whatever spawned this tabloid newspaper report. I can't seem to find anyting on the new scientist website, but if it's credible it's an illustration of how one course of action requires other research and actions to deal with the problems which requires ...

    Brief excerpt:

    The network is facing a congestion due to solar power,' Kohler told the Berliner Zeitung newspaper. 'That's why the expansion of solar power has to be cut back quickly and drastically.'

    His warning highlights one of the problems with rushing too quickly onto relying on renewable sources to fill any energy shortfall.

    Germany this year agreed to reduce subsidies for rooftop panels by 16 percent, which led to a huge take-up of solar power.

    But the problem with solar power is that it is prone to surging when the sun comes, out, usually around midday. Smaller surges can be dealt with by switching off conventional power plants.

    [snip]

    If the current trends continue, experts expect Germany would have a solar power capacity of nearly 50 GW by 2013.

    'That would be a catastrophe for the grids,' Kohler said. He is urging the German government to cap the installation of new solar panels at 1 GW per year.

    Actually, thinking about it Tim might be aware of this story in the German press. (Like most Brits, the German I learned at school is limited to buying train tickets and sausages :-( .)

    Comment Source:I've been trying to find whatever spawned this [tabloid newspaper report](http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1324264/Too-solar-power-overload-national-grid-warns-German-energy-expert.html). I can't seem to find anyting on the new scientist website, but if it's credible it's an illustration of how one course of action requires other research and actions to deal with the problems which requires ... Brief excerpt: > The network is facing a congestion due to solar power,' Kohler told the Berliner Zeitung newspaper. 'That's why the expansion of solar power has to be cut back quickly and drastically.' > His warning highlights one of the problems with rushing too quickly onto relying on renewable sources to fill any energy shortfall. > Germany this year agreed to reduce subsidies for rooftop panels by 16 percent, which led to a huge take-up of solar power. > But the problem with solar power is that it is prone to surging when the sun comes, out, usually around midday. Smaller surges can be dealt with by switching off conventional power plants. [snip] > If the current trends continue, experts expect Germany would have a solar power capacity of nearly 50 GW by 2013. > 'That would be a catastrophe for the grids,' Kohler said. He is urging the German government to cap the installation of new solar panels at 1 GW per year. Actually, thinking about it Tim might be aware of this story in the German press. (Like most Brits, the German I learned at school is limited to buying train tickets and sausages :-( .)
  • 2.

    ...limited to buying train tickets...

    If you are able to get the ticket you need your German is business fluent, no further proof required :-)

    Tim might be aware of this story in the German press.

    No, this story did not make it into national headlines. The story about solar power that did, is the reduction of subsidies of solar power panels by the federal government, which is supposed to cause a higher price of electricity next year.

    Comment Source:<blockquote> <p> ...limited to buying train tickets... </p> </blockquote> If you are able to get the ticket you need your German is business fluent, no further proof required :-) <blockquote> <p> Tim might be aware of this story in the German press. </p> </blockquote> No, this story did not make it into national headlines. The story about solar power that did, is the reduction of subsidies of solar power panels by the federal government, which is supposed to cause a higher price of electricity next year.
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