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El Niño news

The sea surface temperature in the Niño 3.4 region shot up last week, from 15 to 20 June 2014:

Here are the trends from July 2013 to the start of June 2014:

Comments

  • 1.
    edited June 2014

    has this to show and tell:

    Very hot pool of water off Ecuador showing sea surface temperature anomalies in the extraordinarily hot +2.25 to +4 C range with smaller pools of +4 C and hotter water visible in this NOAA/NWS graphic

    During March, sub-sea temperature anomalies spiked to +5 to +6 C above average in the hottest zones. So it appears, now, that some of these sub-sea anomalies are hitting the surface, clogging up the Pacific's ability to soak up atmospheric heat and allowing that heat to accumulate.

    Last week, atmospheric feedback promoting El Nino had appeared to weaken. The east-to-west trade winds had picked up and few countervailing west winds running from Asia toward the Americas were observed. But by this week, the trades had again faded with west winds seen north of the Solomons, east of the Philippines, and along a broad zone in the Eastern Pacific. A re-emergence of an atmospheric feedback necessary for El Nino's continued development.

    Overall, ongoing warming in the Eastern Pacific along with a renewed weakening of the trades shows devolopment toward the predicted El Nino and an ongoing enhanced likelihood that past global high temperature records will continue to fall during 2014.

    Comment Source:* 'Robert Scribbler', [Extreme eastern Pacific sea surface temperature spike looking a lot like El Ni&ntilde;o](http://robertscribbler.wordpress.com/2014/06/20/extreme-eastern-pacific-sea-surface-temperature-spike-looking-a-lot-like-el-nino/), 20 June 2014. has this to show and tell: > <img src = "http://robertscribbler.files.wordpress.com/2014/06/hot-pool-off-ecuador.png" width = "500" alt = ""/> > Very hot pool of water off Ecuador showing sea surface temperature anomalies in the extraordinarily hot +2.25 to +4 C range with smaller pools of +4 C and hotter water visible in this NOAA/NWS graphic > During March, sub-sea temperature anomalies spiked to +5 to +6 C above average in the hottest zones. So it appears, now, that some of these sub-sea anomalies are hitting the surface, clogging up the Pacific's ability to soak up atmospheric heat and allowing that heat to accumulate. > Last week, atmospheric feedback promoting El Nino had appeared to weaken. The east-to-west trade winds had picked up and few countervailing west winds running from Asia toward the Americas were observed. But by this week, the trades had again faded with west winds seen north of the Solomons, east of the Philippines, and along a broad zone in the Eastern Pacific. A re-emergence of an atmospheric feedback necessary for El Nino's continued development. > Overall, ongoing warming in the Eastern Pacific along with a renewed weakening of the trades shows devolopment toward the predicted El Nino and an ongoing enhanced likelihood that past global high temperature records will continue to fall during 2014.
  • 2.

    Here is what's happening now:

    (This should keep updating itself. I moved this over from another thread.)

    Comment Source:Here is what's happening now: <a href = "http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/analysis_monitoring/enso_update/sstanim.shtml"> <img src = "http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/analysis_monitoring/enso_update/sstanim.gif" alt = ""/> </a> <a href = "http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/analysis_monitoring/enso_update/sstanim.shtml"> <img src = "http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/analysis_monitoring/enso_update/sstaanim.gif" alt = ""/> </a> (This should keep updating itself. I moved this over from another thread.)
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