Options

Gravity satellite and water

please see

GRACE

“The first thing I tackled in the 1970s was the task of computing the orbits of satellites very accurately to support satellite altimeter missions,” says Tapley. “We reached the point that we could compute orbits that had an accuracy of a few centimeters.” Eventually his computations hit a glitch that he couldn’t fix. The satellite orbits varied seasonally.

To relate changes in satellite motion to changes in gravity, Bettadpur and his team start by examining what the satellites’ paths ought to look like. They know where the mountains are, and where the oceans grow deep. They know the path of the Sun and the Moon, and the related fluctuation of ocean tides. They know what large weather systems have moved through the atmosphere. And they can determine how much all of these things should pull on the satellites.

In the decade since its launch, GRACE has observed a number of significant changes in the water cycle. GRACE revealed losses in ice mass on Greenland (where the loss is dramatic), Alaska, and Antarctica. The gravity measurements revealed how much the melting glaciers are contributing to sea level rise by recording both ice lost from land and the mass gained in the ocean.

THERE IS A DIAGRAM FOR WATER ANOMALY in CALIF CENTRAL VALLEY.

Comments

  • 1.

    My questions is: could it be that the water changes are affecting the weather, and temperature is a by product of these changes.

    If the water changes impact satellites' orbitals, to the extend that navigators needs to account for water changes, then shouldn't we look at the water as a serious parameter in our work here?

    Comment Source:My questions is: could it be that the water changes are affecting the weather, and temperature is a by product of these changes. If the water changes impact satellites' orbitals, to the extend that navigators needs to account for water changes, then shouldn't we look at the water as a serious parameter in our work here?
  • 2.
    Comment Source:[NASA Satellites Unlock Secret to Northern India's Vanishing Water](http://www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/india_water.html)
  • 3.
    Comment Source:[Groundwater and Soil Moisture Conditions from GRACE Data Assimilation](http://drought.unl.edu/MonitoringTools/NASAGRACEDataAssimilation.aspx) Gosh this is amazing
  • 4.
    nad
    edited December 2014

    NASA Satellites Unlock Secret to Northern India’s Vanishing Water

    Quite impressing how one sees even Delhi on that one map. The red spots in the north of Delhi do look not good together with this prospective: (read text next to man with donkey (can't be cited by mouse paste))

    that is by looking at the Nasa map it doesn't look clear to me that better farming methods etc. in northern india might suffice.

    Comment Source:>NASA Satellites Unlock Secret to Northern India’s Vanishing Water Quite impressing how one sees even Delhi on that one map. The red spots in the north of Delhi do look not good together with this <a href="http://water.nature.org/waterblueprint/city/delhi#/c=6:29.24972:79.08750">prospective: </a> (read text next to man with donkey (can't be cited by mouse paste)) that is by looking at the Nasa map it doesn't look clear to me that better farming methods etc. in northern india might suffice.
  • 5.

    Nad wrote:

    read text next to man with donkey

    Nad that is a cow, not a donkey, I have a little donkey sanctuary and know their hoofs and ears quite well :)

    Comment Source:Nad wrote: > read text next to man with donkey Nad that is a cow, not a donkey, I have a little donkey sanctuary and know their hoofs and ears quite well :)
  • 6.
    nad
    edited December 2014

    Nad that is a cow, not a donkey, I have a little donkey sanctuary and know their hoofs and ears quite well :)

    Aha. If you say so. I wasn't sure. The view onto the ears are a bit obstructed by this thing on its head. But indeed at least in those Wikipedia images the hoofs of the donkeys are all indeed not split. So this "splitness" might be a recognizing feature and if I understood you correctly you say this is always the case. And yes you are right the cows are not among the odd-toed ungulate (Perissodactyla) but the even toe ungulate (Artiodactyla) and the categorization is Artiodactyla -> Cetruminantia -> Pecora -> Bovidae. It seems this animal is (according to Wikipedia) a Zebu.

    Comment Source:>Nad that is a cow, not a donkey, I have a little donkey sanctuary and know their hoofs and ears quite well :) Aha. If you say so. I wasn't sure. The view onto the ears are a bit obstructed by this thing on its head. But indeed at least in those <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donkey#mediaviewer/File:104_Donkeys_in_Tayrona_Park_Colombia.JPG">Wikipedia images</a> the hoofs of the donkeys are all indeed not split. So this "splitness" might be a recognizing feature and if I understood you correctly you say this is always the case. And yes you are right the cows are not among the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Odd-toed_ungulate">odd-toed ungulate (Perissodactyla)</a> but the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Even-toed_ungulate">even toe ungulate (Artiodactyla)</a> and the categorization is Artiodactyla -> Cetruminantia -> Pecora -> <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bovidae">Bovidae.</a> It seems this animal is (according to Wikipedia) a <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zebu">Zebu.</a>
Sign In or Register to comment.