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Pseudomonas syringae: rain making bacteria

This bacteria found in clouds:

Pseudomonas syringae

I find frost in Ireland in our farm, though it is definitely not 0 degree (I thought I was imagining things):

The Rain-Making Bacteria

As P. syringae commonly inhabits plant surfaces, its ice nucleating nature incites frost development at warmer temperatures than 0C,freezing the buds of the plant and destroying the crop.

In other research papers, evidence found that this bacteria moves between the clouds and crust of earth via certain transportation which affects the weather, due to its ability to nucleate water.

Comments

  • 1.

    Sorry you'll have to search for this but the BBC did a "Cloud Lab" experiment which found that bacteria were many times more important in cloud seeding that dust. hth

    Comment Source:Sorry you'll have to search for this but the BBC did a "Cloud Lab" experiment which found that bacteria were many times more important in cloud seeding that dust. hth
  • 2.

    I think we have a narrow view of role of bacteria in climate.

    Comment Source:I think we have a narrow view of role of bacteria in climate.
  • 3.

    I had a run-in with a supposed authority on cloud nucleation by the name of Judith Curry of Georgia Tech. She and her co-author wrote a book, published last year

    curry

    I reviewed the book and pointed out that their use of Bose-Einstein statistics to describe cloud nucleation dynamics for both water droplets and ice crystals was completely incorrect.

    There is no way that the statistics of Bose-Einstein would apply, which requires temperatures much closer to absolute zero than could possibly naturally occur in the atmosphere.

    For my thesis work I did research on crystal growth kinetics and had the most controlled and ideal environment to experiment with. I caught all sorts of grief for pointing out that they are truly going out on a limb with their theories on processes that are difficult to characterize at best -- that of measuring small nucleating masses in the upper atmosphere.

    Comment Source:I had a run-in with a supposed authority on cloud nucleation by the name of Judith Curry of Georgia Tech. She and her co-author wrote a book, published last year ![curry](http://curryja.files.wordpress.com/2014/09/slide1.png?w=500&h=375) I reviewed the book and pointed out that their use of Bose-Einstein statistics to describe cloud nucleation dynamics for both water droplets and ice crystals was completely incorrect. There is no way that the statistics of Bose-Einstein would apply, which requires temperatures much closer to absolute zero than could possibly naturally occur in the atmosphere. For my thesis work I did research on crystal growth kinetics and had the most controlled and ideal environment to experiment with. I caught all sorts of grief for pointing out that they are truly going out on a limb with their theories on processes that are difficult to characterize at best -- that of measuring small nucleating masses in the upper atmosphere.
  • 4.

    WOW Paul! you do not cease impressing me!

    The GPM satellites have the droplet measurements and types!

    Would it be too much ask you to help me out with any references on these nucleation sciences in atmosphere? Just the ref I could get the papers myself.

    You blew my mind away

    Comment Source:WOW Paul! you do not cease impressing me! The GPM satellites have the droplet measurements and types! Would it be too much ask you to help me out with any references on these nucleation sciences in atmosphere? Just the ref I could get the papers myself. You blew my mind away
  • 5.

    Dara, Sure I could help with this area. As I said, my experience has really been in very controlled nucleation kinetics dealing mainly with epitaxial crystal growth.

    Incidentally, my interest in oscillations stemmed from all the time I spent characterizing layer-by-layer growth oscillations in singe crystals. Point an electron beam at the surface of the crystal and the reflected spot does this: RHEED

    Each oscillation period is a layer of atoms!

    Comment Source:Dara, Sure I could help with this area. As I said, my experience has really been in very controlled nucleation kinetics dealing mainly with epitaxial crystal growth. Incidentally, my interest in oscillations stemmed from all the time I spent characterizing layer-by-layer growth oscillations in singe crystals. Point an electron beam at the surface of the crystal and the reflected spot does this: ![RHEED](http://community.dur.ac.uk/sharon.cooper/lectures/cryskinetics/image361.gif) Each oscillation period is a layer of atoms!
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