Options

The Azimuth Project: an open-access educational resource

edited January 2015 in Azimuth Project

I just came across this short talk by John, The Azimuth project: an open-access educational resource.

I like some of the language and tone here, and suggest that we consider incorporating some of its elements into the home page.

However I believe that the homepage is too critical for us to apply the standard procedure of "make changes and then discuss them later."

I'm going to make a page for a draft home page -- with some bold disclaimers at the top saying that this is experimental -- to which we can make changes and discuss them later.

Comments

  • 1.
    edited January 2015

    The main point that I see here is that there is an educational component to the Azimuth Project, and I think that this deserves some mention on the front page.

    This direction is shown, for example, in the Azimuth Blog, and in the initiative to make interactive models for educational purposes.

    It's clearly complementary to more advanced research projects, and it's something that can be worked on, with consistency, even when we are not in moments of great inspiration. And I believe that it is generative of inspiration. Think of the project of building the wiki, and the blog, as that of generating a curriculum for science and math that really matter. To pursue this curriculum as far as possible would lead one into the terrain of research. And by engaging more people in this discourse one is making an indirect contribution to the "saving of the planet."

    Whether the human race actually succeeds here, or is overrun by circumstances, is another question which is beyond our power to foresee or control. But there is, nevertheless, meaning in the present to our creative attempts to advance science, and its extension to education, for the aims of sustainability and regeneration.

    I think that the front page could benefit from additional text expressing some of these points of view. I'd like it to make clear that we are targeting a group of professionals in science-related fields, that we are not an elite organization, and that there is room for many people to contribute, on different levels. For instance, writers can help edit, school teachers can get ideas for their classes, publicists can publicize, and anyone with a sincere interest in the topics of science and math that really matter can ask questions here. And, importantly: programmers help to design the tools, and to build them, which are needed to advance the sciences in this data-intensive world of ours.

    I'll assimilate these ideas and put them into the draft I mentioned.

    Comment Source:The main point that I see here is that there is an educational component to the Azimuth Project, and I think that this deserves some mention on the front page. This direction is shown, for example, in the Azimuth Blog, and in the initiative to make interactive models for educational purposes. It's clearly complementary to more advanced research projects, and it's something that can be worked on, with consistency, even when we are not in moments of great inspiration. And I believe that it is generative of inspiration. Think of the project of building the wiki, and the blog, as that of generating a curriculum for science and math that really matter. To pursue this curriculum as far as possible would lead one into the terrain of research. And by engaging more people in this discourse one is making an indirect contribution to the "saving of the planet." Whether the human race actually succeeds here, or is overrun by circumstances, is another question which is beyond our power to foresee or control. But there is, nevertheless, meaning in the present to our creative attempts to advance science, and its extension to education, for the aims of sustainability and regeneration. I think that the front page could benefit from additional text expressing some of these points of view. I'd like it to make clear that we are targeting a group of professionals in science-related fields, that we are not an elite organization, and that there is room for many people to contribute, on different levels. For instance, writers can help edit, school teachers can get ideas for their classes, publicists can publicize, and anyone with a sincere interest in the topics of science and math that really matter can ask questions here. And, importantly: programmers help to design the tools, and to build them, which are needed to advance the sciences in this data-intensive world of ours. I'll assimilate these ideas and put them into the draft I mentioned.
  • 2.

    Thanks! I'm glad you liked some of the ideas in that talk.

    I agree that the educational aspect of Azimuth is succeeding better, so far, than any other. Even our project on El Niño prediction and climate networks has (so far) had more impact getting people interested in these issues, and teaching them, than in doing actual new research.

    The network theory project is doing a lot of new research, though.

    Comment Source:Thanks! I'm glad you liked some of the ideas in that talk. I agree that the _educational_ aspect of Azimuth is succeeding better, so far, than any other. Even our project on El Niño prediction and climate networks has (so far) had more impact getting people _interested_ in these issues, and teaching them, than in doing actual new research. The network theory project is doing a lot of new research, though.
  • 3.
    edited January 2015

    Great to hear that the network theory project is moving ahead.

    It would nice to think of ways of making connections, in the long term, between Azimuth and that research.

    Comment Source:Great to hear that the network theory project is moving ahead. It would nice to think of ways of making connections, in the long term, between Azimuth and that research.
Sign In or Register to comment.