Options

Lecture 3 - Chapter 1: Preorders

2»

Comments

  • 51.

    @Scott #50 – yes, because antisymmetry identifies any two elements in a cycle

    Comment Source:@Scott #50 – yes, because antisymmetry identifies any two elements in a cycle
  • 52.

    @Anindya #50: thanks.

    Comment Source:@Anindya #50: thanks.
  • 53.

    Scott: this is correct! And I'm pretty sure I've convinced Brendan and David to change their terminology so it matches the rest of the world's. They will keep updating their book, fixing mistakes we find... and I think I've managed to get them to make this change too.

    Comment Source:Scott: this is correct! And I'm pretty sure I've convinced Brendan and David to change their terminology so it matches the rest of the world's. They will keep updating their book, fixing mistakes we find... and I think I've managed to get them to make this change too.
  • 54.

    Thanks @Scott, your post is immensely clarifying and exactly the sort of thing I hoped for in studying "applied" category theory.

    Comment Source:Thanks [@Scott](https://forum.azimuthproject.org/profile/1894/Scott%20Finnie), your [post](https://forum.azimuthproject.org/discussion/comment/16340/#Comment_16340) is immensely clarifying and exactly the sort of thing I hoped for in studying "applied" category theory.
  • 55.

    I'm a bit confused by Remark 1.24. Are Fong & Spivak just saying that what's normally called a "partially ordered set" will be referred to as a "skeletal poset"? It's a bit confusing that a partially ordered set is an extension of something that sounds like "partially ordered set" in its name.

    Comment Source:I'm a bit confused by _Remark 1.24_. Are Fong & Spivak just saying that what's normally called a "partially ordered set" will be referred to as a "skeletal poset"? It's a bit confusing that a partially ordered set is an extension of something that _sounds like_ "partially ordered set" in its name.
  • 56.
    edited April 2018

    Jared Davis - I've talked Fong and Spivak out of calling partially ordered sets "skeletal posets". Please download the latest copy of Seven Sketches. The problem that's bothering you will be gone, and Remark 1.24 will be transformed into something more reasonable: a remark pointing out that a skeletal preorder is a poset.

    Comment Source:Jared Davis - I've talked Fong and Spivak out of calling partially ordered sets "skeletal posets". Please [download the latest copy of _Seven Sketches_](http://math.mit.edu/~dspivak/teaching/sp18/7Sketches.pdf). The problem that's bothering you will be gone, and Remark 1.24 will be transformed into something more reasonable: a remark pointing out that a skeletal preorder is a poset.
Sign In or Register to comment.