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Introduction: Jared Davis

I am a programmer, or, what I sometimes call a "data plumber". I started college thinking I'd study mathematics, but was drawn into a philosophy degree instead. I've maintained a strong interest in mathematics broadly as well as run local discussion groups to keep fresh.

I am especially looking forward to what Seven Sketches will say about databases and signal flows.

Comments

  • 1.
    edited April 8

    Hi! I think you'll find that category theory is deeply philosophical... if you want to think about it that way. It introduces a world-view that goes way beyond the old set-theoretic foundations of mathematics. Even you're now a programmer, you might enjoy Categories for the Working Philosopher. Many of the individual chapters can be found free online.

    Comment Source:Hi! I think you'll find that category theory is deeply philosophical... if you want to think about it that way. It introduces a world-view that goes way beyond the old set-theoretic foundations of mathematics. Even you're now a programmer, you might enjoy _[Categories for the Working Philosopher](https://global.oup.com/academic/product/categories-for-the-working-philosopher-9780198748991)_. Many of the individual chapters can be found free online.
  • 2.

    woof, that's quite a price tag, must be why I haven't gotten my hands on it yet. Looking at the TOC, the essays seem very interesting. Thanks!

    Comment Source:woof, that's quite a price tag, must be why I haven't gotten my hands on it yet. Looking at the TOC, the essays seem _very_ interesting. Thanks!
  • 3.

    I've found an affordable copy of Categories for the Working Philosopher on Amazon. Thank you again for the suggestion; I should be in a better place to get more from the volume after following along with this course the past couple weeks.

    Comment Source:I've found an affordable copy of _Categories for the Working Philosopher_ on Amazon. Thank you again for the suggestion; I should be in a better place to get more from the volume after following along with this course the past couple weeks.
  • 4.

    Welcome Jared!

    Other book that I've found likable is this:

    "From a Geometrical Point of View. A Study of the History and Philosophy of Category Theory" by Jean-Pierre Marquis. ISBN 978-1-4020-9383-8.

    The idea of symmetry has influenced the development of physics decisively, and in mathematics Klein's Erlangen program has shown its power of organization of different areas of Geometry. Marquis starts the book investigating how Categories can be a generalization of groups and help to formulate an extended Klein program.

    The book is enriched by historical exposition and particular attention is given to the introduction of adjoints. Chapter 5 on adjoints tackles the same theme of our last lecture, 17, both for posets and for general categories.

    On the other hand I'm sure you are not going to be dissapointed by the categorical rendering of databases and data-flows. I also do software, and was working in a boring data importer for a mysql DB and somehow I ended in an slide deck from Spivak, had a sudden click!-moment, and thought: this is it.

    Comment Source:Welcome Jared! Other book that I've found likable is this: > "From a Geometrical Point of View. A Study of the History and Philosophy of Category Theory" by Jean-Pierre Marquis. ISBN 978-1-4020-9383-8. The idea of symmetry has influenced the development of physics decisively, and in mathematics Klein's Erlangen program has shown its power of organization of different areas of Geometry. Marquis starts the book investigating how Categories can be a generalization of groups and help to formulate an extended Klein program. The book is enriched by historical exposition and particular attention is given to the introduction of adjoints. Chapter 5 on adjoints tackles the same theme of our last lecture, 17, both for posets and for general categories. On the other hand I'm sure you are not going to be dissapointed by the categorical rendering of databases and data-flows. I also do software, and was working in a boring data importer for a mysql DB and somehow I ended in an slide deck from Spivak, had a sudden click!-moment, and thought: this is it.
  • 5.

    I feel you, Jesus. I have a mysql DB importer that I've got on the docket, and I'm not particularly enthusiastic about the task.

    I am looking forward to the databases and data-flows portions of the book. I understand these to be Spivak's specialty?

    Comment Source:I feel you, Jesus. I have a mysql DB importer that I've got on the docket, and I'm not particularly enthusiastic about the task. I am looking forward to the databases and data-flows portions of the book. I understand these to be Spivak's specialty?
  • 6.

    :-) Yes, Spivak uses the Grothendiek construction to evidence the relation among tuples (table rows) and the database schema, for one thing, and also to relate RDF a-box triples to a (t-box) ontology. Independently there is an interesting tutorial of Michael Robinson I'm reading just now using sheaf theory on finite simplicial complexes in applied scenarios of data or sensor readings integration and would love to relate both views.

    Comment Source::-) Yes, Spivak uses the Grothendiek construction to evidence the relation among tuples (table rows) and the database schema, for one thing, and also to relate RDF a-box triples to a (t-box) ontology. Independently there is an interesting [tutorial](http://www.drmichaelrobinson.net/sheaftutorial/index.html) of Michael Robinson I'm reading just now using sheaf theory on finite simplicial complexes in applied scenarios of data or sensor readings integration and would love to relate both views.
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