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Travel footprint

"What's up with me" in British English means "what's wrong with me". I'll answer both questions. I'm flying from Singapore to London on Friday. During the flight, I'll try to distil the reading I have been doing on atmospheric chemistry during the past weeks. I've ordered a great textbook on Atmospheric Chemistry that awaits me in the UK (more later). I started thinking about the Ozone layer, more on the lines of "why was action successful in that case ('tame Problem') compared to climate change action ('wicked problem')" (to use Hartwell paper language). Atmospheric chemistry became more interesting than the socio-political aspects (though I think the latter are as important as the science). From there to precision isotope ratio measurements by mass spectrometry (of which I know something), then to aerosols and surface chemistry. Isotope ratios are widely used proxies for all manner of things. Chemistry on this scale yet at low concentrations is utterly fascinating, and the reading could be endless.

I'm winding up my lab in Singapore and will return to the UK next year, so we are busy writing papers. To that extent, and also because I don't see climate action primarily as a scientific problem, I'm unlikely to post much outside atmospheric chemistry and isotope measurements.

I'm curious to know how much carbon dioxide I will add to the atmosphere flying to London (I do this every few months). It's the Singapore Airlines A380. British Airways has a voluntary carbon footprint charge (80 GBP if memory serves me). Fortunately, the travelling will end next year. (In part mitigation, I have long stopped going to conferences).

Comments

  • 1.
    edited November 2010

    I hope you're having fun in England, Walter. If you're back by Friday November 26th, we could go to the Colbar. Lisa just went to Germany and she'll be back on Saturday.

    To that extent, and also because I don't see climate action primarily as a scientific problem, I'm unlikely to post much outside atmospheric chemistry and isotope measurements.

    I'm eager to get some Azimuth Project articles on those subjects from you. For example, the Milankovitch cycle page now mentions Vostok ice core deuterium and benthic foram $\delta$18O proxies... but I don't know how they work.

    Please don't wait until you're an expert - if I did that, I'd never write about anything! It's also hard for experts to write in a way that nonexperts can understand. I find it nice to keep revisiting topics and writing more and more about them as I learn more, correcting my earlier mistakes but not deleting the earlier, simpler stories.

    I'm curious to know how much carbon dioxide I will add to the atmosphere flying to London (I do this every few months). It's the Singapore Airlines A380.

    I don't know about individual planes, but for what it's worth, Terrapass estimates that one round-trip economy class flight from Singapore to Heathrow with one stop puts 5,721 lbs of CO2 into the air, or 2.6 tonnes.

    To offset that, you can write 2.6 tonnes of articles on the Azimuth Project.

    Comment Source:I hope you're having fun in England, Walter. If you're back by Friday November 26th, we could go to the Colbar. Lisa just went to Germany and she'll be back on Saturday. >To that extent, and also because I don't see climate action primarily as a scientific problem, I'm unlikely to post much outside atmospheric chemistry and isotope measurements. I'm eager to get some Azimuth Project articles on those subjects from you. For example, the [[Milankovitch cycle]] page now mentions Vostok ice core deuterium and benthic foram $\delta$<sup>18</sup>O proxies... but I don't know how they work. Please don't wait until you're an expert - if I did that, I'd never write about anything! It's also hard for experts to write in a way that nonexperts can understand. I find it nice to keep revisiting topics and writing more and more about them as I learn more, correcting my earlier mistakes but not deleting the earlier, simpler stories. >I'm curious to know how much carbon dioxide I will add to the atmosphere flying to London (I do this every few months). It's the Singapore Airlines A380. I don't know about individual planes, but for what it's worth, [Terrapass](http://www.terrapass.com/carbon-footprint-calculator/#air) estimates that one round-trip economy class flight from Singapore to Heathrow with one stop puts 5,721 lbs of CO<sub>2</sub> into the air, or 2.6 tonnes. To offset that, you can write 2.6 tonnes of articles on the Azimuth Project.
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