Options

Categories in Quantum Physics - A Discussion Group

edited April 2018 in MIT 2019: Chat

We've got a bunch of people interested in the connection between category theory and quantum physics - including quantum computation and quantum information theory. So, here's a place for us to talk about it!

For a fun way to get started, read this:

Comments

  • 1.

    Prasanna Venkatesh writes:

    Hello All! I am a theory postdoc at the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, Innsbruck. My research interests are in Quantum Optics, Ultracold atomic physics and Quantum Thermodynamics. I came to the forum via reading about the Azimuth Project and I am now fascinated by the Category Theory course that is currently running. I am quite a novice in pure mathematics and look forward to learning via the lectures and interactions here.

    In my own work the closest I have come to pure mathematics, apart from courses in mathematics in my undergraduate institution Chennai Mathematical Institute, was the application of ideas from Catastrophe Theory while studying bistability in systems of cold atoms confined to optical resonators during my PhD at McMaster University. More recently, while working on work fluctuation theorems for quantum systems, I found that many people have discovered interesting links between information theory and thermodynamics. I am also interested in studying these links more closely in the future.

    Finally, I also have interests in programming but mostly biased to tasks relevant in my physics research such as solving stochastic differential equations. Interestingly, the first programming language I learnt was Haskell during my undergrad (I was told later by some computer science friends that this is quite non-standard for Indian undergrad institutes) and look forward to understanding the connections between category theory and Haskell.

    Comment Source:[Prasanna Venkatesh](https://forum.azimuthproject.org/discussion/2040/introduction-prasanna-venkatesh#Head) writes: > Hello All! [I am](https://sites.google.com/site/bprasannavenkateshphys/) a theory postdoc at the [Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, Innsbruck](https://iqoqi.at/en/). My research interests are in Quantum Optics, Ultracold atomic physics and Quantum Thermodynamics. I came to the forum via reading about the Azimuth Project and I am now fascinated by the Category Theory course that is currently running. I am quite a novice in pure mathematics and look forward to learning via the lectures and interactions here. > In my own work the closest I have come to pure mathematics, apart from courses in mathematics in my undergraduate institution [Chennai Mathematical Institute](http://www.cmi.ac.in/), was the application of ideas from Catastrophe Theory while studying bistability in systems of cold atoms confined to optical resonators during my PhD at [McMaster University](https://www.physics.mcmaster.ca/). More recently, while working on work fluctuation theorems for quantum systems, I found that many people have discovered interesting links between information theory and thermodynamics. I am also interested in studying these links more closely in the future. > Finally, I also have interests in programming but mostly biased to tasks relevant in my physics research such as solving stochastic differential equations. Interestingly, the first programming language I learnt was Haskell during my undergrad (I was told later by some computer science friends that this is quite non-standard for Indian undergrad institutes) and look forward to understanding the connections between category theory and Haskell.
  • 2.

    Grant Roy writes:

    I'm a software engineer in the Pierce Lab at Caltech, where I work on NUPACK as part of the molecular programming project. I'm interested in algorithms and applications geared toward understanding and designing bio-molecular functionality. I'm also really interested in quantum computing, and in particular the design of novel quantum algorithms/circuits that could be useful in the biological sciences. I have a more general interest in the idea of open scientific collaboration and learning, and consequently I am very excited about this course!

    Comment Source:[Grant Roy](https://forum.azimuthproject.org/discussion/1738/introduction-grant-roy#Head) writes: > I'm a software engineer in the Pierce Lab at Caltech, where I work on NUPACK as part of the molecular programming project. I'm interested in algorithms and applications geared toward understanding and designing bio-molecular functionality. I'm also really interested in quantum computing, and in particular the design of novel quantum algorithms/circuits that could be useful in the biological sciences. I have a more general interest in the idea of open scientific collaboration and learning, and consequently I am very excited about this course!
  • 3.

    As for me, I've written a lot about quantum mechanics and categories. I think these are the best places to start, to get what I was doing:

    • John Baez, Quantum quandaries: a category-theoretic perspective, Published in Structural Foundations of Quantum Gravity, eds. Steven French, Dean Rickles and Juha Saatsi, Oxford U. Press, 2006, pp. 240-265.

    • John Baez and Aaron Lauda, A prehistory of n-categorical physics, in Deep Beauty: Mathematical Innovation and the Search for an Underlying Intelligibility of the Quantum World, ed. Hans Halvorson, Cambridge U. Press, Cambridge, 2011, pp. 13-128.

    Comment Source:As for me, I've written a lot about quantum mechanics and categories. I think these are the best places to start, to get what I was doing: * John Baez, [Quantum quandaries: a category-theoretic perspective](http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/quantum/), Published in _Structural Foundations of Quantum Gravity_, eds. Steven French, Dean Rickles and Juha Saatsi, Oxford U. Press, 2006, pp. 240-265. * John Baez and Aaron Lauda, [A prehistory of n-categorical physics](http://arxiv.org/abs/0908.2469), in _Deep Beauty: Mathematical Innovation and the Search for an Underlying Intelligibility of the Quantum World_, ed. Hans Halvorson, Cambridge U. Press, Cambridge, 2011, pp. 13-128.
  • 4.

    Wow, Excellent!

    Comment Source:Wow, Excellent!
  • 5.

    There's a lot on my reading list now!

    Comment Source:There's a lot on my reading list now!
  • 6.
    edited April 2018

    Professor Baez, in your opinion, is there some topics/roadmap that deserves to be highlighted about the involution theme in Quantum physics , considering applied category ?

    Comment Source:Professor Baez, in your opinion, is there some topics/roadmap that deserves to be highlighted about the involution theme in Quantum physics , considering applied category ?
  • 7.

    I don't know what you mean by "the involution theme". I can guess...

    Comment Source:I don't know what you mean by "the involution theme". I can guess...
  • 8.
    edited April 2018

    Ok if occur to me some good reformulation of it will post it Thanks. Best regards

    Comment Source: Ok if occur to me some good reformulation of it will post it Thanks. Best regards
Sign In or Register to comment.