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Introduction Mohan Radhakrishnan

I am a Software architect who likes to code multiple languages. Even though I work on Java projects I frequently write R and Python code for Machine Learning work. After learning basic Haskell and Ocaml I am now intrigued by Category theory. I think there are so many opportunities to code frameworks and reusable tools using FP languages and Category theory and I am rather sad that I and my teams don't even know where to start and how to apply it to business problems.

I have an innate need to learn by coding small tools and I also have to apply it to practical software problems. And I am overwhelmed by the number of different threads discussing topics too advanced for me.

Where should I start actually ?

Comments

  • 1.
    edited February 26

    The forum is not very active now, but you can still get a lot out of it by starting the course here:

    You'll see 77 "lectures" on Fong and Spivak's book (which is free online), and lots of solved exercises, and lots of discussion. They start with very simple ideas, and they lead up to a lot of fundamental concepts in category theory.

    This course may not be as directly connected with programming as you'd like. If you want something directly connected to programming, I suggest this other course:

    The main thing is to stick with a course and patiently think about the ideas, solve exercises, and ask questions until these ideas make sense. All the important ideas in category theory are obvious once you get them - so if they don't seem obvious, you just need to keep thinking about them.

    You can ask questions here, but I'm busy enough that I don't promise to answer them! If you want to grab my attention, you can post a comment on the Azimuth Blog, for example here:

    Comment Source:The forum is not very active now, but you can still get a lot out of it by starting the course here: * [[Applied Category Theory Course]]. You'll see 77 "lectures" on Fong and Spivak's book (which is free online), and lots of solved exercises, and lots of discussion. They start with very simple ideas, and they lead up to a lot of fundamental concepts in category theory. This course may not be as directly connected with programming as you'd like. If you want something directly connected to programming, I suggest this other course: * Bartosz Milewski, [Category Theory for Programmers](https://bartoszmilewski.com/2014/10/28/category-theory-for-programmers-the-preface/). The main thing is to stick with a course and patiently think about the ideas, solve exercises, and ask questions until these ideas make sense. All the important ideas in category theory are obvious once you get them - so if they don't seem obvious, you just need to keep thinking about them. You can ask questions here, but I'm busy enough that I don't promise to answer them! If you want to grab my attention, you can post a comment on the Azimuth Blog, for example here: * [Applied Category Theory Seminar](https://johncarlosbaez.wordpress.com/2018/12/14/applied-category-theory-seminar/).
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