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Azimuth Code Project

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  • 101.

    Made github repos for the Azimuth googlecode code and populated them.

    Comment Source:Made [github repos](https://github.com/azimuth-project) for the Azimuth googlecode code and populated them. * [[David Tweed]]'s C++ code as [DSE](https://github.com/azimuth-project/DSE) * [[Tim van Beek]]'s Java/Scala code as [SDEModels](https://github.com/azimuth-project/SDEModels) * [[Graham Jones]]'s R code as [PredatorPreySDE](https://github.com/azimuth-project/PredatorPreySDE)
  • 102.

    I've not used github before, and have just joined as Graham853.

    It says azimuth-project has kenwebb and Allan Erskine as the only members.I'm confused.

    On the other hand, I searched for 'azimuth' under users, and got to azimuth-project.

    Comment Source:I've not used github before, and have just joined as Graham853. It says azimuth-project has kenwebb and Allan Erskine as the only members.I'm confused. On the other hand, I searched for 'azimuth' under users, and got to azimuth-project.
  • 103.

    Hi Graham, For reasons unknown searching for azimuth-project in the github repo doesn't find it ;(. The repo can be accesed via the following link here. I added authors, copyright and BSD liceses to the repos. I hope I correctly identified and attributed people's codes. I've added Graham853 as an owner, commiter or whatever. Do let me know if there are any probs.

    Comment Source:Hi Graham, For reasons unknown searching for azimuth-project in the github repo doesn't find it ;(. The repo can be accesed via the following link [here](https://github.com/azimuth-project). I added authors, copyright and BSD liceses to the repos. I hope I correctly identified and attributed people's codes. I've added Graham853 as an owner, commiter or whatever. Do let me know if there are any probs.
  • 104.

    Great!! We're moving.

    Comment Source:Great!! We're moving.
  • 105.
    edited May 2014

    Jim Stuttard wrote:

    Allan Erskine proposed using a continuous build system.

    That's putting the cart before the horse. In the first place, what is it that we are building?

    Continuous build systems are a fantastic tool, and shine most especially in large multi-developer projects where there is a single codebase whose integrity -- both in terms of successful compilation, and the passing of suites of unit tests -- needs to be continually maintained.

    For those who aren't up on all the latest jargon, I'll give an illustration of the idea, taking as an example our system at work. Whenever someone checks in some code to the repository, a build agent running on a build server detects the event and then builds the system from source, by compiling the classes, linking them, and what have you. Any compilation failure raises a red flag to the whole team, and the programmer who broke the build sweats to fix it as quickly as possible, and check in these changes. Furthermore, after the build server compiles the whole application, it can run unit tests on the code, and report any test failures -- again, raising a red flag, causing the programmer to sweat and fix (but not as much as for a compilation failure). In this way, so the theory goes, regressions to the code will be automatically be detected by the unit tests.

    But at Azimuth, today, we've mainly got a handful of small web applications, under single user control. We don't need a jackhammer to dig a hole in the garden. And learning how to manage the jackhammer would take all our time away from gardening. For our current needs, test-and-fix is a perfect fit.

    More generally speaking, I think we stand a greater chance of success if we are guided by the "needs" of the Azimuth project, rather than by technologies. The TODO list should be our focal point, not the HOWTO list. This is no Luddite position. Our technology choices will be more apropos when they are made in the context of our whole-group dicussions of what models to build, how they are defined, what algorithms to use, and so on.

    Comment Source:Jim Stuttard wrote: > Allan Erskine proposed using a continuous build system. That's putting the cart before the horse. In the first place, what is it that we are building? Continuous build systems are a fantastic tool, and shine most especially in large multi-developer projects where there is a single codebase whose integrity -- both in terms of successful compilation, and the passing of suites of unit tests -- needs to be continually maintained. For those who aren't up on all the latest jargon, I'll give an illustration of the idea, taking as an example our system at work. Whenever someone checks in some code to the repository, a build agent running on a build server detects the event and then builds the system from source, by compiling the classes, linking them, and what have you. Any compilation failure raises a red flag to the whole team, and the programmer who broke the build sweats to fix it as quickly as possible, and check in these changes. Furthermore, after the build server compiles the whole application, it can run unit tests on the code, and report any test failures -- again, raising a red flag, causing the programmer to sweat and fix (but not as much as for a compilation failure). In this way, so the theory goes, regressions to the code will be automatically be detected by the unit tests. But at Azimuth, today, we've mainly got a handful of small web applications, under single user control. We don't need a jackhammer to dig a hole in the garden. And learning how to manage the jackhammer would take all our time away from gardening. For our current needs, test-and-fix is a perfect fit. More generally speaking, I think we stand a greater chance of success if we are guided by the "needs" of the Azimuth project, rather than by technologies. The TODO list should be our focal point, not the HOWTO list. This is no Luddite position. Our technology choices will be more apropos when they are made in the context of our whole-group dicussions of what models to build, how they are defined, what algorithms to use, and so on.
  • 106.
    edited May 2014

    Jim Stuttard wrote:

    As you're organising the software pages of the wiki I'll leave it up to you to link to, move or delete whatever's on the Petri net and Functional reactive programming pages.

    I think you should keep up the good work that you've been doing on those pages. But I'll take a look, maybe I can contribute our joint editing efforts.

    FRP looks very exciting as a potential platform for writing model programs. As such, it deserves a place on the Azimuth Code Project page. Tomorrow I have a go at this. Regards.

    Comment Source:Jim Stuttard wrote: > As you're organising the software pages of the wiki I'll leave it up to you to link to, move or delete whatever's on the [[Petri net]] and [[Functional reactive programming]] pages. I think you should keep up the good work that you've been doing on those pages. But I'll take a look, maybe I can contribute our joint editing efforts. FRP looks very exciting as a potential platform for writing model programs. As such, it deserves a place on the Azimuth Code Project page. Tomorrow I have a go at this. Regards.
  • 107.

    Hi Graham, For reasons unknown searching for azimuth-project in the github repo doesn’t find it ;(.

    I am completely new to git and github, but I was trying to say is that I think that azimuth-project is not a repository in github. azimuth-project is a user.

    The repo can be accesed via the following link here.

    I think 'the repo' means: the set of repositories belonging to user azimuth-project.

    I’ve added Graham853 as an owner, commiter or whatever.

    I can see the list of repositories (BurgersExample, etc) but I cannot see your name or David's, or mine anywhere, only kenwebb and Allan Erskine.

    Do let me know if there are any probs.

    My problems are almost certainly do with not understanding git, and nothing you've done. I have installed Git Bash and Git GUI. In the former, following instructions in the book "Pro Git" I did

    $ git config --global user.name "Graham853"
    
    Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest
    $ git config --global user.email  xxxxxxxxxx
    

    but I can't clone anything:

    Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest
    $ git clone git:github.com/shacon/grit.git
    Cloning into 'grit'...
    ssh: git: no address associated with name
    fatal: Could not read from remote repository.
    
    Please make sure you have the correct access rights
    and the repository exists.
    

    and:

    Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest
    $ git clone git:github.com/azimuth-project
    Cloning into 'azimuth-project'...
    ssh: git: no address associated with name
    fatal: Could not read from remote repository.
    
    Please make sure you have the correct access rights
    and the repository exists.
    
    Comment Source:> Hi Graham, For reasons unknown searching for azimuth-project in the github repo doesn’t find it ;(. I am completely new to git and github, but I was trying to say is that I think that azimuth-project is **not** a repository in github. azimuth-project is a **user**. > The repo can be accesed via the following link here. I think 'the repo' means: the set of repositories belonging to user azimuth-project. > I’ve added Graham853 as an owner, commiter or whatever. I can see the list of repositories (BurgersExample, etc) but I cannot see your name or David's, or mine anywhere, only kenwebb and Allan Erskine. > Do let me know if there are any probs. My problems are almost certainly do with not understanding git, and nothing you've done. I have installed Git Bash and Git GUI. In the former, following instructions in the book "Pro Git" I did ~~~~ $ git config --global user.name "Graham853" Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest $ git config --global user.email xxxxxxxxxx ~~~~ but I can't clone anything: ~~~~ Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest $ git clone git:github.com/shacon/grit.git Cloning into 'grit'... ssh: git: no address associated with name fatal: Could not read from remote repository. Please make sure you have the correct access rights and the repository exists. ~~~~ and: ~~~~ Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest $ git clone git:github.com/azimuth-project Cloning into 'azimuth-project'... ssh: git: no address associated with name fatal: Could not read from remote repository. Please make sure you have the correct access rights and the repository exists. ~~~~
  • 108.
    edited May 2014

    Dave wrote:

    We don’t need a jackhammer to dig a hole in the garden. And learning how to manage the jackhammer would take all our time away from gardening. For our current needs, test-and-fix is a perfect fit.

    Agreed, I think Allan was proposing this as a strategic milestone. Iiuc the idea was to use CI for deployment so anybody on the CI system would get automatically deployed upgrades if they selected the appropriate script. We do need continuous testing of applications against dependency upgrades. I agree this should be done manually for the foreseeable future.

    Graham, using ssh, to be able to push I had to edit .git/config and change the syntax:

    [remote "origin"] url=https://github.com/azimuth-project/myproject

    to

    [remote "origin"] git@github.com:azimuth-project/my project

    The git pro book seems to imply that ssh is the preferred security option but the interweb chat claims that LDAP is adequate and there are about 3 different solutions. I didn't have the mileage to understand the difference between ssh and ssh over https but the above worked for me.

    Dave, what transport, syntax and settings are you using to push to github?

    I would really appreciate it if somebody read the Petri net and FRP pages and suggested what needs to be done to make them useful.

    I'm looking forward to reading the finished blog article and your Burgers code. I built the U. Texas aerospace Crank-Nicholson Burgers Fortran code which I've linked to several times on the forum after Tim started writing about it. But he wanted an FFT solution.

    It looks like i'm in for a good Saturday morning :)

    Comment Source:Dave wrote: > We don’t need a jackhammer to dig a hole in the garden. And learning how to manage the jackhammer would take all our time away from gardening. For our current needs, test-and-fix is a perfect fit. Agreed, I think Allan was proposing this as a strategic milestone. Iiuc the idea was to use CI for deployment so anybody on the CI system would get automatically deployed upgrades if they selected the appropriate script. We do need continuous testing of applications against dependency upgrades. I agree this should be done manually for the foreseeable future. Graham, using ssh, to be able to push I had to edit .git/config and change the syntax: > [remote "origin"] > url=https://github.com/azimuth-project/myproject to > [remote "origin"] > git@github.com:azimuth-project/my project The git pro book seems to imply that ssh is the preferred security option but the interweb chat claims that LDAP is adequate and there are about 3 different solutions. I didn't have the mileage to understand the difference between ssh and ssh over https but the above worked for me. Dave, what transport, syntax and settings are you using to push to github? I would really appreciate it if somebody read the Petri net and FRP pages and suggested what needs to be done to make them useful. I'm looking forward to reading the finished blog article and your Burgers code. I built the U. Texas aerospace Crank-Nicholson Burgers Fortran code which I've linked to several times on the forum after Tim started writing about it. But he wanted an FFT solution. It looks like i'm in for a good Saturday morning :)
  • 109.

    Thanks Jim. I get a bit further but

    Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest2
    $ git clone git@github.com:azimuth-project/PredatorPreySDE
    Cloning into 'PredatorPreySDE'...
    The authenticity of host 'github.com (192.30.252.130)' can't be established.
    RSA key fingerprint is 16:27:ac:a5:76:28:2d:36:63:1b:56:4d:eb:df:a6:48.
    Are you sure you want to continue connecting (yes/no)? y
    Please type 'yes' or 'no': yes
    Warning: Permanently added 'github.com,192.30.252.130' (RSA) to the list of know
    n hosts.
    Permission denied (publickey).
    fatal: Could not read from remote repository.
    
    Please make sure you have the correct access rights
    and the repository exists.
    

    BTW, look at the source of my post for how to enter code here.

    Comment Source:Thanks Jim. I get a bit further but ~~~~ Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest2 $ git clone git@github.com:azimuth-project/PredatorPreySDE Cloning into 'PredatorPreySDE'... The authenticity of host 'github.com (192.30.252.130)' can't be established. RSA key fingerprint is 16:27:ac:a5:76:28:2d:36:63:1b:56:4d:eb:df:a6:48. Are you sure you want to continue connecting (yes/no)? y Please type 'yes' or 'no': yes Warning: Permanently added 'github.com,192.30.252.130' (RSA) to the list of know n hosts. Permission denied (publickey). fatal: Could not read from remote repository. Please make sure you have the correct access rights and the repository exists. ~~~~ BTW, look at the source of my post for how to enter code here.
  • 110.
    edited May 2014

    The git method I've just got to work (I should be doing it all remotely but haven't groked it properly as my attempts have failed so far) is:

    • create a new repo from the azimuth-project organisation/user page.
    • tick the box to create a README.md file
    • add gitignore and BSD license
    • git clone https://github.com/azimuth-project/myproject
    • vi .git/config and make the changes in the previous post.
    • git push origin master

    This code on the forum business I think is

    four spaces => pink

    &gt => green

    The instiki destructions claim that four dashes above and below is supposed to be for code but that is the markdown syntax for headers and that's what i get on instiki ie. large font.

    hth.

    Comment Source:The git method I've just got to work (I should be doing it all remotely but haven't groked it properly as my attempts have failed so far) is: * create a new repo from the azimuth-project organisation/user page. * tick the box to create a README.md file * add gitignore and BSD license * git clone https://github.com/azimuth-project/myproject * vi .git/config and make the changes in the previous post. * git push origin master This code on the forum business I think is four spaces => pink &gt => green The instiki destructions claim that four dashes above and below is supposed to be for code but that is the markdown syntax for headers and that's what i get on instiki ie. large font. hth.
  • 111.
    edited May 2014

    vi .git/config and make the changes in the previous post.

    You said you had to edit .git/config , but not how to edit it. I don't even know where to find it.

    Four tildes for code.

    Comment Source:> vi .git/config and make the changes in the previous post. You said you had to edit .git/config , but not how to edit it. I don't even know where to find it. Four tildes for code.
  • 112.

    After you've done a git clone in the directory where you want the particular project directory to be and cd'd into it then you should have a .git subdirectory with a file called "config" in it. I just edited that as above using vi.

    Four tildes for code
    

    I see what you mean. I'll adopt the convention of green for quotes and pink for code which is very clear and readable.

    I can't keep up with markdown html hell. I like yaml, rst and md but haven't worked out the tradeoffs in using any one of them. I use John Macfarlane's Haskell application yst which generates a complete static website from a single yaml file, csv or sqlite database to generate html from yaml.

    For all text conversions I use JGM's brilliant pandoc applications which has done all my format conversions flawlessly for the past several years. It should be flawless as JGM is the chair of philosophy at Berkeley and a great programmer.

    Comment Source:After you've done a git clone in the directory where you want the particular project directory to be and cd'd into it then you should have a .git subdirectory with a file called "config" in it. I just edited that as above using vi. ~~~~ Four tildes for code ~~~~ I see what you mean. I'll adopt the convention of green for quotes and pink for code which is very clear and readable. I can't keep up with markdown html hell. I like yaml, rst and md but haven't worked out the tradeoffs in using any one of them. I use John Macfarlane's Haskell application [yst](http://hackage.haskell.org/package/yst) which generates a complete static website from a single yaml file, csv or sqlite database to generate html from yaml. For all text conversions I use JGM's brilliant [pandoc](http://hackage.haskell.org/package/pandoc) applications which has done all my format conversions flawlessly for the past several years. It should be flawless as JGM is the chair of philosophy at Berkeley and a great programmer.
  • 113.

    I have finally managed to clone PredatorPreySDE. The main issues were to do with SSH keys. I edited the README, committed it in git locally, and now get to

    Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest2/PredatorPreySDE (master)
    $ git push origin master
    Enter passphrase for key '/c/Users/Work/.ssh/id_rsa':
    ERROR: Permission to azimuth-project/PredatorPreySDE.git denied to Graham853.
    fatal: Could not read from remote repository.
    
    Please make sure you have the correct access rights
    and the repository exists.
    
    Comment Source:I have finally managed to clone PredatorPreySDE. The main issues were to do with SSH keys. I edited the README, committed it in git locally, and now get to ~~~~ Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest2/PredatorPreySDE (master) $ git push origin master Enter passphrase for key '/c/Users/Work/.ssh/id_rsa': ERROR: Permission to azimuth-project/PredatorPreySDE.git denied to Graham853. fatal: Could not read from remote repository. Please make sure you have the correct access rights and the repository exists. ~~~~
  • 114.
    edited May 2014

    I used http rather than https. Then there's no keys, etc.

    Comment Source:I used http rather than https. Then there's no keys, etc.
  • 115.
    edited May 2014

    I tried using http. No keys required, just github password, but still no luck.

    Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest2/PredatorPreySDE (master)
    $ git push http://github.com/azimuth-project/PredatorPreySDE master
    Username for 'https://github.com': Graham853
    Password for 'https://Graham853@github.com':
    remote: Permission to azimuth-project/PredatorPreySDE.git denied to Graham853.
    fatal: unable to access 'https://github.com/azimuth-project/PredatorPreySDE/': T
    he requested URL returned error: 403
    
    Comment Source:I tried using http. No keys required, just github password, but still no luck. ~~~~ Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest2/PredatorPreySDE (master) $ git push http://github.com/azimuth-project/PredatorPreySDE master Username for 'https://github.com': Graham853 Password for 'https://Graham853@github.com': remote: Permission to azimuth-project/PredatorPreySDE.git denied to Graham853. fatal: unable to access 'https://github.com/azimuth-project/PredatorPreySDE/': T he requested URL returned error: 403 ~~~~
  • 116.
    edited May 2014

    Graham, What OS are you on? I interpret no passphrase means no ssh installed. Can you check? I don't think http is acceptable on security grounds. Dave, I didn't think http could be used to push to the repo so what syntax did you use as you can only clone from https or ssh (git@github.com:azimuth-project/myproject)?

    I've read that LDAP can verify remote connection but otherwise its ssh over https.

    Comment Source:Graham, What OS are you on? I interpret no passphrase means no ssh installed. Can you check? I don't think http is acceptable on security grounds. Dave, I didn't think http could be used to push to the repo so what syntax did you use as you can only clone from https or ssh (git@github.com:azimuth-project/myproject)? I've read that LDAP can verify remote connection but otherwise its ssh over https.
  • 117.

    Hi Graham, I just checked out that project, added a test file, and committed it.

    Here are the steps that I went through:

    cd to the local directory where you're repositories are to be cloned.

    git clone http://github.com/azimuth-project/PredatorPreySDE

    This creates the subtree.

    cd PredatorPreySDE/

    create file test.txt.

    git add test.txt

    git status

    git commit -m "testing git commits"

    git push

    Comment Source:Hi Graham, I just checked out that project, added a test file, and committed it. Here are the steps that I went through: cd to the local directory where you're repositories are to be cloned. git clone http://github.com/azimuth-project/PredatorPreySDE This creates the subtree. cd PredatorPreySDE/ create file test.txt. git add test.txt git status git commit -m "testing git commits" git push
  • 118.

    Thanks. I did what you did (I hope), but still no joy.

    Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest3
    $ git clone http://github.com/azimuth-project/PredatorPreySDE
    Cloning into 'PredatorPreySDE'...
    remote: Counting objects: 18, done.
    remote: Compressing objects: 100% (13/13), done.
    remote: Total 18 (delta 4), reused 17 (delta 3)
    Unpacking objects: 100% (18/18), done.
    Checking connectivity... done.
    
    Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest3
    $ cd PredatorPreySDE/
    
    Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest3/PredatorPreySDE (master)
    $ git add test2.txt
    
    Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest3/PredatorPreySDE (master)
    $ git status
    On branch master
    Your branch is up-to-date with 'origin/master'.
    
    Changes to be committed:
      (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage)
    
            new file:   test2.txt
    
    
    Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest3/PredatorPreySDE (master)
    $ git commit -m “testing git commit”
    error: pathspec 'git' did not match any file(s) known to git.
    error: pathspec 'commit”' did not match any file(s) known to git.
    

    This is odd: it took a minute to realise it is the comment it doesn't like

    Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest3/PredatorPreySDE (master)
    $ git commit -m “testing git commits”
    error: pathspec 'git' did not match any file(s) known to git.
    error: pathspec 'commits”' did not match any file(s) known to git.
    
    Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest3/PredatorPreySDE (master)
    $ git commit -m “testing”
    [master 320b36d] “testing”
     1 file changed, 1 insertion(+)
     create mode 100644 test2.txt
    

    One word comment seems OK (Later: Probably smart quotes confusing things)

    Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest3/PredatorPreySDE (master)
    $ git push
    warning: push.default is unset; its implicit value is changing in
    Git 2.0 from 'matching' to 'simple'. To squelch this message
    and maintain the current behavior after the default changes, use:
    
      git config --global push.default matching
    
    To squelch this message and adopt the new behavior now, use:
    
      git config --global push.default simple
    
    When push.default is set to 'matching', git will push local branches
    to the remote branches that already exist with the same name.
    
    In Git 2.0, Git will default to the more conservative 'simple'
    behavior, which only pushes the current branch to the corresponding
    remote branch that 'git pull' uses to update the current branch.
    
    See 'git help config' and search for 'push.default' for further information.
    (the 'simple' mode was introduced in Git 1.7.11. Use the similar mode
    'current' instead of 'simple' if you sometimes use older versions of Git)
    

    Don't understand. Is it relevant?

    Username for 'https://github.com': Graham853
    Password for 'https://Graham853@github.com':
    remote: Permission to azimuth-project/PredatorPreySDE.git denied to Graham853.
    fatal: unable to access 'https://github.com/azimuth-project/PredatorPreySDE/': T
    he requested URL returned error: 403
    

    And back to that.

    Comment Source:Thanks. I did what you did (I hope), but still no joy. ~~~~ Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest3 $ git clone http://github.com/azimuth-project/PredatorPreySDE Cloning into 'PredatorPreySDE'... remote: Counting objects: 18, done. remote: Compressing objects: 100% (13/13), done. remote: Total 18 (delta 4), reused 17 (delta 3) Unpacking objects: 100% (18/18), done. Checking connectivity... done. Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest3 $ cd PredatorPreySDE/ Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest3/PredatorPreySDE (master) $ git add test2.txt Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest3/PredatorPreySDE (master) $ git status On branch master Your branch is up-to-date with 'origin/master'. Changes to be committed: (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage) new file: test2.txt Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest3/PredatorPreySDE (master) $ git commit -m “testing git commit” error: pathspec 'git' did not match any file(s) known to git. error: pathspec 'commit”' did not match any file(s) known to git. ~~~~ This is odd: it took a minute to realise it is the **comment** it doesn't like ~~~~ Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest3/PredatorPreySDE (master) $ git commit -m “testing git commits” error: pathspec 'git' did not match any file(s) known to git. error: pathspec 'commits”' did not match any file(s) known to git. Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest3/PredatorPreySDE (master) $ git commit -m “testing” [master 320b36d] “testing” 1 file changed, 1 insertion(+) create mode 100644 test2.txt ~~~~ One word comment seems OK (Later: Probably smart quotes confusing things) ~~~~ Work@FEB2012-PC ~/AAA/Programming/gittest3/PredatorPreySDE (master) $ git push warning: push.default is unset; its implicit value is changing in Git 2.0 from 'matching' to 'simple'. To squelch this message and maintain the current behavior after the default changes, use: git config --global push.default matching To squelch this message and adopt the new behavior now, use: git config --global push.default simple When push.default is set to 'matching', git will push local branches to the remote branches that already exist with the same name. In Git 2.0, Git will default to the more conservative 'simple' behavior, which only pushes the current branch to the corresponding remote branch that 'git pull' uses to update the current branch. See 'git help config' and search for 'push.default' for further information. (the 'simple' mode was introduced in Git 1.7.11. Use the similar mode 'current' instead of 'simple' if you sometimes use older versions of Git) ~~~~ Don't understand. Is it relevant? ~~~~ Username for 'https://github.com': Graham853 Password for 'https://Graham853@github.com': remote: Permission to azimuth-project/PredatorPreySDE.git denied to Graham853. fatal: unable to access 'https://github.com/azimuth-project/PredatorPreySDE/': T he requested URL returned error: 403 ~~~~ And back to that.
  • 119.
    edited May 2014

    You weren't on the Owners list. I just added you.

    Comment Source:You weren't on the Owners list. I just added you.
  • 120.

    Yay, there are now two silly test files there! Thanks again.

    Comment Source:Yay, there are now two silly test files there! Thanks again.
  • 121.

    Great.

    Comment Source:Great.
  • 122.
    edited May 2014

    Good catch Dave, I wouldn't have thought of it. I entered "Graham853" in the "add member by username" box and hit return. I've no idea why that didn't work? Graham, I very glad you've now got your rights.

    Apologies to both of you for not checking my claim.

    So as penance I'd better write up the destructions for other folk when we agree what they should be ;)

    Comment Source:Good catch Dave, I wouldn't have thought of it. I entered "Graham853" in the "add member by username" box and hit return. I've no idea why that didn't work? Graham, I very glad you've now got your rights. Apologies to both of you for not checking my claim. So as penance I'd better write up the destructions for other folk when we agree what they should be ;)
  • 123.
    edited May 2014

    It's a two step process, first you add the user then give them rights as owner. Visibility of the user is also configurable. Cheers

    Comment Source:It's a two step process, first you add the user then give them rights as owner. Visibility of the user is also configurable. Cheers
  • 124.

    Tnx. Didn't grok that.

    Comment Source:Tnx. Didn't grok that.
  • 125.

    Added Cloud computing page and link.

    Comment Source:Added [[Cloud computing]] page and link.
  • 126.

    Thanks Jim and Nad for working on this page, it's coming into shape.

    Comment Source:Thanks Jim and Nad for working on this page, it's coming into shape.
  • 127.

    Jim, I like the idea of the new section that you added. I made a couple of changes to it. You had called it "Azimuth IT Infrastructure," and gave it sections on the blog, the wiki, Azimuth Model Server, computational frameworks, and code repository.

    You mentioned where the blog was running (you said at UCR, but actually it's the main site hosted by wordpress), and mentioned the new wiki running on rails playground.

    Though we can mention them, the blog, forum and wiki are most definitely the core of our IT infrastructure, but I don't see this as central to what the Azimuth code project is really about. Nor whether we used Latex, or Word to produce our reports. The code project is about creating new software for scientific and educational purposes.

    So I changed the emphases around.

    I changed the title of this whole section to "Computational Infrastructure," and removed the sections on the blog and the wiki.

    The sections are now Azimuth Model Server, Language Frameworks, and Code Repository. I'm going to add another section for IT infrastructure, which give a mention of wordpress, Instiki and the Forum. However, I'd prefer not to mention where our servers are running. It's no secret, since we talk about it here, but still, one day if we become more successful in our goals, there may be more people with ill will towards the project, so there's no need to advertise the specifics of such things like who is hosting our servers.

    Comment Source:Jim, I like the idea of the new section that you added. I made a couple of changes to it. You had called it "Azimuth IT Infrastructure," and gave it sections on the blog, the wiki, Azimuth Model Server, computational frameworks, and code repository. You mentioned where the blog was running (you said at UCR, but actually it's the main site hosted by wordpress), and mentioned the new wiki running on rails playground. Though we can mention them, the blog, forum and wiki are most definitely the core of our IT infrastructure, but I don't see this as central to what the Azimuth code project is really about. Nor whether we used Latex, or Word to produce our reports. The code project is about creating new software for scientific and educational purposes. So I changed the emphases around. I changed the title of this whole section to "Computational Infrastructure," and removed the sections on the blog and the wiki. The sections are now Azimuth Model Server, Language Frameworks, and Code Repository. I'm going to add another section for IT infrastructure, which give a mention of wordpress, Instiki and the Forum. However, I'd prefer not to mention where our servers are running. It's no secret, since we talk about it here, but still, one day if we become more successful in our goals, there may be more people with ill will towards the project, so there's no need to advertise the specifics of such things like who is hosting our servers.
  • 128.

    The section on Language Frameworks mentions our current platform, Javascript + JSXGraph, Functional reactive programming, and has the link to the semantic web page.

    Nad, I agree that the semantic web, Web 2.0 or what have you, may hold the key to the future, and may play an important role in the climate modeling tools to come.

    So I kept the link to the "construction page" in the Language Frameworks section. I'm still uncomfortable about linking to it in a prominent place, when all that it contains is a reference to one paper that you wrote, with no descriptive text whatsoever.

    But we can easily fix this. I'll start up another thread to talk about semantic web applications and their potential for applications to climate models. Once we discuss it a bit, that should lead to enough for us to transfer a couple of paragraphs to the wiki. I have read your paper, and there were some key points which came across to me.

    Comment Source:The section on Language Frameworks mentions our current platform, Javascript + JSXGraph, Functional reactive programming, and has the link to the semantic web page. Nad, I agree that the semantic web, Web 2.0 or what have you, may hold the key to the future, and may play an important role in the climate modeling tools to come. So I kept the link to the "construction page" in the Language Frameworks section. I'm still uncomfortable about _linking_ to it in a prominent place, when all that it contains is a reference to one paper that you wrote, with no descriptive text whatsoever. But we can easily fix this. I'll start up another thread to talk about semantic web applications and their potential for applications to climate models. Once we discuss it a bit, that should lead to enough for us to transfer a couple of paragraphs to the wiki. I have read your paper, and there were some key points which came across to me.
  • 129.

    +1

    Comment Source:+1
  • 130.

    Nad, I agree that the semantic web, Web 2.0 or what have you, may hold the key to the future, and may play an important role in the climate modeling tools to come.

    I feel uncomfortable if you say web 2.0 may hold the key to the future since there are applications which I find problematic (you may want to read in this context also my comment here) but yes it may also play an important role in the climate modeling tools to come or other environmental tools.

    I’m still uncomfortable about linking to it in a prominent place, when all that it contains is a reference to one paper that you wrote, with no descriptive text whatsoever.

    Well if readers are warned of that (next to the link) than I find this is bearable and as you said this may change:

    Once we discuss it a bit, that should lead to enough for us to transfer a couple of paragraphs to the wiki.

    I am not sure how much I'll be further able to discuss things related to semantic web and environment, but thanks for reading the article:

    I have read your paper, and there were some key points which came across to me.

    I hope that I may at least occasionally comment.

    Comment Source:>Nad, I agree that the semantic web, Web 2.0 or what have you, may hold the key to the future, and may play an important role in the climate modeling tools to come. I feel uncomfortable if you say web 2.0 may hold the key to the future since there are applications which I find problematic (you may want to read in this context also <a href="http://golem.ph.utexas.edu/category/2014/04/should_mathematicians_cooperat_1.html#c046611">my comment here</a>) but yes it may also play an important role in the climate modeling tools to come or other environmental tools. >I’m still uncomfortable about linking to it in a prominent place, when all that it contains is a reference to one paper that you wrote, with no descriptive text whatsoever. Well if readers are warned of that (next to the link) than I find this is bearable and as you said this may change: > Once we discuss it a bit, that should lead to enough for us to transfer a couple of paragraphs to the wiki. I am not sure how much I'll be further able to discuss things related to semantic web and environment, but thanks for reading the article: > I have read your paper, and there were some key points which came across to me. I hope that I may at least occasionally comment.
  • 131.
    edited June 2014

    Jim: I decredited you on comment 54 above. You seem as assiduous about avoiding undue credit as many academics are in seeking it!

    Comment Source:Jim: I decredited you on comment 54 above. You seem as assiduous about avoiding undue credit as many academics are in seeking it!
  • 132.

    I improved this page a bit:

    In the process I noticed an annoying phantom page with a trailing space in its name:

    shown here as a +. It seems impossible to edit this other page: when I try, I get taken to the "real" page without a trailing space in its name! But it had some information missing from the "real" page. I transferred most of that over. (Some seemed unnecessary.)

    Comment Source:I improved this page a bit: * [[Azimuth Code Project]] In the process I noticed an annoying phantom page with a trailing space in its name: * [http://www.azimuthproject.org/azimuth/show/Azimuth+Code+Project+](http://www.azimuthproject.org/azimuth/show/Azimuth+Code+Project+) shown here as a +. It seems impossible to edit this other page: when I try, I get taken to the "real" page without a trailing space in its name! But it had some information missing from the "real" page. I transferred most of that over. (Some seemed unnecessary.)
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