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My new job

I have just started work at the Centre for Theoretical Biology in Gothenburg (Hi Staffan!). I will be working (probably for a year) on phylogenetic methods for dealing with allopolyploids. I will mainly be working from my home in Scotland, with regular visits to Sweden.

This is all very new to me. As I say here I have been self-employed since finishing my PhD back in 1983. In lots of ways - new science, getting used to academia and being employed, new people, new places - I have been on a steep learning curve over the past couple of months, and that will continue for some time, not leaving much room for Azimuth.

I wasn't actually looking for a job - someone found my website and invited me to apply. When I told a biologist friend this, one of her comments was `bloody mathematicians!'. Mere biologists struggle long and hard to find research positions.

More details on the project itself.

Comments

  • 1.

    Congratulations.

    Comment Source:Congratulations.
  • 2.

    I wasn't actually looking for a job - someone found my website and invited me to apply.

    Wow! Congratulations too.

    Comment Source:> I wasn't actually looking for a job - someone found my website and invited me to apply. Wow! Congratulations too.
  • 3.

    That's great. It seems people often get jobs in the ways they least suspect!

    I have a mathematician friend who did his PhD work on branching processes in phylogenetic analysis. (See here and here.) He's now a statistics lecturer studying Bayesian inference with complex computer models (including climate models).

    Comment Source:That's great. It seems people often get jobs in the ways they least suspect! I have a mathematician friend who did his PhD work on branching processes in phylogenetic analysis. (See <a href="http://www.maths.nottingham.ac.uk/personal/pmzrdw/Papers/EstimatingPrimates.pdf">here</a> and <a href="http://www.maths.nottingham.ac.uk/personal/pmzrdw/Papers/Integrated.pdf">here</a>.) He's now a statistics lecturer studying Bayesian inference with complex computer models (including climate models).
  • 4.
    edited April 2011

    Congrats Graham and welcome to sweden! Hope we can as the americans say touch base some day. I live in Stockholm so probably you could go here visiting the Stockholm Resilience Centre (headed by J Rockstrom) .

    Actually I like Goteborg a lot - but the only problem is that sometimes it rains or snows horizontally so if you plan on biking around you should always wear a snorkel, this was a tip i got from a friend/colleague who lived and worked there for two years :-)

    Comment Source:Congrats Graham and welcome to sweden! Hope we can as the americans say touch base some day. I live in Stockholm so probably you could go here visiting the [[Stockholm Resilience Centre]] (headed by J Rockstrom) . Actually I like Goteborg a lot - but the only problem is that sometimes it rains or snows horizontally so if you plan on biking around you should always wear a snorkel, this was a tip i got from a friend/colleague who lived and worked there for two years :-)
  • 5.
    edited April 2011

    Congratulations, Graham!

    You may not have much time for Azimuth for a while, but you'll become more of a bigshot, and that's good for us in the long run.

    If you learn interesting stuff, I hope you let us know about it, at least tersely. I'm trying to learn all sorts of stuff about mathematical biology, mainly related to "networks" and also probability theory, so anything you hear about that would be interesting to me!

    Comment Source:Congratulations, Graham! <img src = "http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/thumbsup.gif" alt = ""/> You may not have much time for Azimuth for a while, but you'll become more of a bigshot, and that's good for us in the long run. If you learn interesting stuff, I hope you let us know about it, at least tersely. I'm trying to learn all sorts of stuff about mathematical biology, mainly related to "networks" and also probability theory, so anything you hear about that would be interesting to me!
  • 6.

    Thanks for the replies!

    @John: not sure about becoming a bigshot, but perhaps I'll be able to point some botanists this way...

    @Staffan: I hired a bike for a week the last time I was in Göteborg, 6-13 April, and was very impressed with the cycle paths. Also I visited nature reserves at Delsjön, and the island of Vrångö at the weekend in beautiful weather. I live in NW Scotland, the true home of horizontal rain, so am unlikely to be perturbed by the mild Göteborg version.

    Comment Source:Thanks for the replies! @John: not sure about becoming a bigshot, but perhaps I'll be able to point some botanists this way... @Staffan: I hired a bike for a week the last time I was in Göteborg, 6-13 April, and was very impressed with the cycle paths. Also I visited nature reserves at Delsjön, and the island of Vrångö at the weekend in beautiful weather. I live in NW Scotland, the true home of horizontal rain, so am unlikely to be perturbed by the mild Göteborg version.
  • 7.

    Then you are all set for Göteborg :-) Actually as me and my wife do a lot of trekking we had planned to go to N Scotland but my sister in law broke a leg so we have to postbone that a while. The bike paths in sweden are good at least in major cities. Maybe not like NL or Denmark but definitely good, so many swedes bicycle to work. Here in stockholm it has become so popular so its become a positive problem, and we really need more paths

    Comment Source:Then you are all set for Göteborg :-) Actually as me and my wife do a lot of trekking we had planned to go to N Scotland but my sister in law broke a leg so we have to postbone that a while. The bike paths in sweden are good at least in major cities. Maybe not like NL or Denmark but definitely good, so many swedes bicycle to work. Here in stockholm it has become so popular so its become a positive problem, and we really need more paths
  • 8.

    'postbone' is a wonderfully apt misspelling of 'postpone' for the case where the postponement is due to a broken bone. Did you know what you were doing?

    Next time I visit Sweden in May I plan to do some more serious walking and/or cycling with one or two friends. People I've asked so far say I should head for Norway - where would you recommend? BTW I recommend W Scotland rather than N Scotland, with NW being the very best ;-)

    Comment Source:'postbone' is a wonderfully apt misspelling of 'postpone' for the case where the postponement is due to a broken bone. Did you know what you were doing? Next time I visit Sweden in May I plan to do some more serious walking and/or cycling with one or two friends. People I've asked so far say I should head for Norway - where would you recommend? BTW I recommend W Scotland rather than N Scotland, with NW being the very best ;-)
  • 9.
    edited April 2011

    Hi Graham,

    you didn't ask this to me, but I would definitely opt for Norway instead of Sweden

    if you haven't been in Norway, the Lofoten islands are great, and the region around the Sognefjord. In May I would recommand the latter. The good thing is that May is before the touristic season, though there may be some snow.

    from Gothenburg you can easily go by train or bus, if you want to avoid planes

    NSB and SJ are very comfortable

    the best region in Sweden is the far north in Lapland, though Staffan should correct me if necessary ;-)

    Frederik

    Comment Source:Hi Graham, you didn't ask this to me, but I would definitely opt for Norway instead of Sweden if you haven't been in Norway, the Lofoten islands are great, and the region around the Sognefjord. In May I would recommand the latter. The good thing is that May is before the touristic season, though there may be some snow. from Gothenburg you can easily go by train or bus, if you want to avoid planes NSB and SJ are very comfortable the best region in Sweden is the far north in Lapland, though Staffan should correct me if necessary ;-) Frederik
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