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Blog - Week 314

I need to get Thomas Fischbacher to give it his final corrections and approval, but the first part of my interview with him is here:

Blog - Week 314

Comments

  • 1.

    I like it. The "double-digging" part reminded me about a "deep plow" engine that people told me about in my home village, a plow that would dig deeper than one meter. The farmers would rent it from time to time to counteract the soil compactification that resulted from them driving on their land with heavy tractors.

    I did not find any english translation, but "Tiefpflügen" resulted in some hits on google.

    Comment Source:I like it. The "double-digging" part reminded me about a "deep plow" engine that people told me about in my home village, a plow that would dig deeper than one meter. The farmers would rent it from time to time to counteract the soil compactification that resulted from them driving on their land with heavy tractors. I did not find any english translation, but "Tiefpflügen" resulted in some hits on google.
  • 2.

    I like it too. Where's part two? ;)

    a small comment, probably due to my lack of English vocabulary:

    why anyone bothers to garden with annuals any other way

    I suppose annuals are garden plants you have to plant again each year?

    In Collapse Jared Diamond discusses a lot about erosion (and also salination, which he claims broke down the agricultural societies of the Fertile Crescent) and compares the results of the agricultural methods of the Vikings in Norway (heavy clay soils deposited by glaciers) with Iceland (fertile soils deposited by vulcanoes; but light, and easily carried away by winds). So apparantly when they introduced sheep, the grazing removed the grasslands, and the soils were blown away, leaving deserts.

    Comment Source:I like it too. Where's part two? ;) a small comment, probably due to my lack of English vocabulary: > why anyone bothers to garden with annuals any other way I suppose annuals are garden plants you have to plant again each year? In Collapse Jared Diamond discusses a lot about erosion (and also salination, which he claims broke down the agricultural societies of the Fertile Crescent) and compares the results of the agricultural methods of the Vikings in Norway (heavy clay soils deposited by glaciers) with Iceland (fertile soils deposited by vulcanoes; but light, and easily carried away by winds). So apparantly when they introduced sheep, the grazing removed the grasslands, and the soils were blown away, leaving deserts.
  • 3.
    edited June 2011

    Aaah, great, loveit! He's very well explaining and detailing things I tried for years and in vain to tell them hominids.

    we have the capacity to act as the most powerful repair species around


    an important part of the sustainability challenge is to build the capacity to act and make sound decisions under emotional stress

    I'd recommend Buddhist philosophy of mind: What hurts most and is the major source of emotional stress (plus, deluded non-thinking, rationalization, etc.) is the Ego. But the ego is an illusion, a ghost. Get rid of that superfluous ballast. At least get aware of Ego's deceptive play. (Acually methinks researching/meditating math is a very good start...) Here's a nice quote from one of my favorite Buddhists (plus ecologist plus activist), Joanna Macy:

    When we open our eyes to what is happening, even when it breaks our hearts, we discover our true size; for our heart, when it breaks open, can hold the whole universe.


    Typo:

    sequare meter

    Comment Source:Aaah, great, loveit! He's very well explaining and detailing things I tried for years and in vain to tell them hominids. > we have the capacity to act as the most powerful repair species around ------------ > an important part of the sustainability challenge is to build the capacity to act and make sound decisions under emotional stress I'd recommend Buddhist philosophy of mind: What hurts most and is the major source of emotional stress (plus, deluded non-thinking, rationalization, etc.) is the Ego. But the ego is an illusion, a ghost. Get rid of that superfluous ballast. At least get aware of Ego's deceptive play. (Acually methinks researching/meditating math is a very good start...) Here's a nice quote from one of my favorite Buddhists (plus ecologist plus activist), Joanna Macy: > When we open our eyes to what is happening, even when it breaks our hearts, we discover our true size; for our heart, when it breaks open, can hold the whole universe. ---------------------- Typo: > sequare meter
  • 4.
    edited June 2011

    The interview is now on the Azimuth Blog. For those of you like Tim and Martin who already read it on the wiki, please check out the last few paragraphs, which are new.

    There are also a few new links, most notably a fascinating video comparing the recent oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico to a bigger one back in 1979:

    Comment Source:The interview is now on <a href = "http://johncarlosbaez.wordpress.com/2011/06/06/this-weeks-finds-week-314/">the Azimuth Blog</a>. For those of you like Tim and Martin who already read it on the wiki, please check out the last few paragraphs, which are new. There are also a few new links, most notably a fascinating video comparing the recent oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico to a bigger one back in 1979: * Rachel Maddow, <a href = "http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HA0wPc9TicA">Ixtoc Deepwater Horizon parallels</a>, YouTube.
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