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Online visualization

I'd like to provide some visualizations to blog posts or wiki entries that are about numerical simulation techniques, but wasn't sure how to do it, until now. After looking around a little bit, I think that the google app engine is a possibility. Google offers free web hosting - up to a certain limit of traffic and data that we will never ever exhaust with Azimuth.

So, today I registered and uploaded the hello world application from the google web toolkit:

Hello world!

I think I could start with an interactive graphic for stochastic resonance.

The google app engine works with both Java and Python. Maybe the Python supports makes it easier to program visualizations of climate code that already has been translated from FORTRAN to Python.

Comments

  • 1.

    Comment Source:<img src = "http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/emoticons/thumbsup.gif" alt = ""/>
  • 2.

    @Tim I don't know if you know the software jReality. It has been mainly made for (mathematically challenging) interactive 3D graphics and audios. Its open source.

    Comment Source:@Tim I don't know if you know the software <a href="http://www.jreality.de">jReality</a>. It has been mainly made for (mathematically challenging) interactive 3D graphics and audios. Its open source.
  • 3.

    @Tim: I should may be add, that my husband is involved in the jreality project, but he is currently rather burned away by having currently amongst others a teaching load of 11 lecture hours per week.

    Comment Source:@Tim: I should may be add, that my <a href="http://www.math.tu-berlin.de/~hoffmann/">husband</a> is involved in the jreality project, but he is currently rather burned away by having currently amongst others a teaching load of 11 lecture hours per week.
  • 4.

    No, I don't, thanx for the tip! I'll have a look at it.

    I encountered the google web toolkit in my everyday job: I'm consulting a web project and have to recommend a new framework. I will recommend JSF + RichFaces, but I thought it could be fun to implement some toy examples for Azimuth with the GWT.

    There is a nice widget library available from Sencha, called Ext GWT. They have widgets for graphics, 2D though, that I thought could be used for a visualization of stochastic resonance in a double well potential.

    Comment Source:No, I don't, thanx for the tip! I'll have a look at it. I encountered the google web toolkit in my everyday job: I'm consulting a web project and have to recommend a new framework. I will recommend JSF + RichFaces, but I thought it could be fun to implement some toy examples for Azimuth with the GWT. There is a nice widget library available from Sencha, called <a href="http://www.sencha.com/products/extgwt/">Ext GWT</a>. They have widgets for graphics, 2D though, that I thought could be used for a visualization of stochastic resonance in a double well potential.
  • 5.
    nad
    edited June 2011

    jreality is more client side oriented. that is you need to have java on your computer. client side orientation is recommended for intensive data manipulations. jreality has a software viewer, which you can use in a browser, but you can also use opengl - if you need really fast graphics processing.

    For 2D applications a server side solution may be eventually enough.

    Comment Source:jreality is more client side oriented. that is you need to have java on your computer. client side orientation is recommended for intensive data manipulations. jreality has a software viewer, which you can use in a browser, but you can also use opengl - if you need really fast graphics processing. For 2D applications a server side solution may be eventually enough.
  • 6.

    Nad wrote:

    jreality is more client side oriented

    The buzzwords that I know are fat or rich client for software that uses native support of the operating system of the computer of the end user, and thin client if only the rendering is done on the computer of the end user, which includes web clients.

    In this case I would like to provide some opportunity to play around with simple systems, especially with energy balance models. This should be as easy as possible, therefore I went for a web application in the cloud. It does not cost me anything (exception time, of course), and it is just a click away for everybody else. No downloads, no logins, no installations, no registration.

    I think this could turn out to be fun, and enlightning. And I'm sure others have done that already, but I don't know who. Anyway, google's app engine and cloud infrastructure is a hot topic for web developers right now. It is hip, man!

    Comment Source:Nad wrote: <blockquote> <p> jreality is more client side oriented </p> </blockquote> The buzzwords that I know are fat or rich client for software that uses native support of the operating system of the computer of the end user, and thin client if only the rendering is done on the computer of the end user, which includes web clients. In this case I would like to provide some opportunity to play around with simple systems, especially with energy balance models. This should be as easy as possible, therefore I went for a web application in the cloud. It does not cost me anything (exception time, of course), and it is just a click away for everybody else. No downloads, no logins, no installations, no registration. I think this could turn out to be fun, and enlightning. And I'm sure others have done that already, but I don't know who. Anyway, google's app engine and cloud infrastructure is a hot topic for web developers right now. It is hip, man!
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