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More people getting involved

Here's some good news:

  1. George Musser, a science writer who is an editor for Scientific American, is coming to the Centre for Quantum Technologies here in Singapore from 10 October to 17 December 2011. I found this out in a Google+ conversation when I happened to mention I was in Singapore. He will be visiting to write a book on "nonlocality and emergent spacetime", but when I said I was really interested in climate change these days, he suggested that we write a couple of joint blog posts on climate change! He has written about "detection and attribution" questions. This is great news for lots of reasons.

  2. I am hiring Brendan Fong as an intern during September 2011. He has just graduated from the mathematics department at Australian National University and is starting a masters in mathematics and the foundations of computer science at Oxford in October 2011. He has written a thesis on algebraic geometry but is now working on image analysis for plant growth modelling, with Jinhai Cai of the Phenomics and Bioinformatics Research Centre at the University of South Australia. He wants to help with my "network theory" program. For starters, we'll try to find a quantum-field-theory-based proof that any equilibrium solution of the rate equation for a chemical reaction network also gives an equilibrium solution of the master equation.

  3. Over on Google Plus, Cameron Smith has expressed interest in writing an article for the Azimuth Blog:

I would enjoy writing an article for Azimuth. I view that paper from my former life as a synthetic biologist as something I've moved on from; although, if there were some particular reason to be interested in it, I could rehash it. Now I'm interested in gene regulatory networks, multi-level selection theory (evolution) and what I think I see as a connection there to categories.

Perhaps it would be better to discuss in another thread elsewhere, but one thing I'd really like to do is along the lines of tacking biology onto your and Mike Stay's Rosetta Stone paper. Something like your network theory but focused on the evolution of gene regulatory networks and maybe making more explicit use of categories. Does this sound too ambitious, and perhaps too nebulous, for an Azimuth article? To make one reference to the purpose of the article that originated this thread, it would be a nice chance to push in the direction of treating a "blog post" with as much care as one would treat a peer-reviewed paper (it's somewhat ironic that I think the peer review I've observed on Azimuth bests the "peer-review" I've experienced in my nascent career in "science"...if nothing else it's certainly much more dynamic). I've got a set of references and links gathered together that I think carve a path in the directions I mentioned (maybe you have others as well or think this whole concept is rubbish!), but this is already too long for a "comment" so I'll stop.

As you'll note, two of these three items are directly due to Google Plus. (The third is due to the blog, which Brendan has been reading.) So, Google Plus may be a useful way of making connections and accelerating the growth of the Azimuth Project.

Comments

  • 1.

    one thing I'd really like to do is along the lines of tacking biology onto your and Mike Stay's Rosetta Stone paper. Something like your network theory but focused on the evolution of gene regulatory networks and maybe making more explicit use of categories. Does this sound too ambitious, and perhaps too nebulous, for an Azimuth article?

    Phantastic! I've had halluzinations of such things recently. -- If only I had more time reading up to say anything meaningful... I won't mind the ambitious and nebulous - if only my inspiration is kept up until retirement age (when I plan to look more into the gory details...).

    Comment Source:> one thing I'd really like to do is along the lines of tacking biology onto your and Mike Stay's [Rosetta Stone paper](http://arxiv.org/abs/0903.0340). Something like your [network theory](http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/networks/networks.html) but focused on the evolution of gene regulatory networks and maybe making more explicit use of categories. Does this sound too ambitious, and perhaps too nebulous, for an Azimuth article? Phantastic! I've had halluzinations of such things recently. -- If only I had more time reading up to say anything meaningful... I won't mind the ambitious and nebulous - if only my inspiration is kept up until retirement age (when I plan to look more into the gory details...).
  • 2.
    edited July 2011

    I just referred a few people who have been working on sustainability, resilience, and post-collapse scenarios who also have a science and math background, from Twitter discussions I've been having and explorations. They were intrigued by the Azimuth Project.

    Hopefully, some of them will contribute here soon as well.

    Vinay Gupta is one of them. He wrote this very interesting post on power and the five biggest problems he sees, just yesterday.

    Comment Source:I just referred a few people who have been working on sustainability, resilience, and post-collapse scenarios who also have a science and math background, from Twitter discussions I've been having and explorations. They were intrigued by the Azimuth Project. Hopefully, some of them will contribute here soon as well. Vinay Gupta is one of them. He wrote [this very interesting post on power and the five biggest problems he sees](http://vinay.howtolivewiki.com/blog/other/on-the-practical-exercise-of-power-or-why-the-old-white-dudes-keep-winning-2598), just yesterday.
  • 3.

    I've also started to reshare to some and always cross-post on LinkedIn,twitter and FBook, when I think its relevant. +Google has most of the features that enables azimuth info sharing in a much better way than eg FBook for now. Have a look at hangouts (videoconfs) and Sparks (search streams bookmarks u can share from, both to groups and externally via Share On.

    Comment Source:I've also started to reshare to some and always cross-post on LinkedIn,twitter and FBook, when I think its relevant. +Google has most of the features that enables azimuth info sharing in a much better way than eg FBook for now. Have a look at hangouts (videoconfs) and Sparks (search streams bookmarks u can share from, both to groups and externally via Share On.
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