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Biodiversity

I started a long-needed page on Biodiversity to accomodate Thomas Riepe's pointer to the Worldwide Wildlife Fund's new report.

Comments

  • 1.

    I was looking at the cbd links (trying to find some numerical data on biodiversity) and some of the links didn't work. I think I made most of failing linkspoint to the places you intended, although I'm not 100 per cent sure, and there are two marked with Problem that I couldn't see where the destination was.

    Comment Source:I was looking at the cbd links (trying to find some numerical data on biodiversity) and some of the links didn't work. I _think_ I made most of failing linkspoint to the places you intended, although I'm not 100 per cent sure, and there are two marked with **Problem** that I couldn't see where the destination was.
  • 2.

    I've added another reference and links to new pages Systematic biology and Taxonomy.

    Comment Source:I've added another reference and links to new pages [[Systematic biology]] and [[Taxonomy]].
  • 3.
    edited October 2010

    Thanks for noting those problems, David. One link I fixed and one I got rid of — seems to require a password.

    Thanks, whoever added a Google Books link regarding Colin Tudge's The Variety of Life. I think saying just "Link" is a bit vague. Though we do that now in the recommended reading, I don't recommend it. I changed it to a link like this:

    • Colin Tudge, The Variety of Life, Oxford U. Press, Oxford, 2002. Google Books.

    We should get more quantitative data on the biodiversity page! And preferably weave it into a readable story.

    Thanks, Graham, for new pages on systematic biology and taxonomy!

    I'm a bit of a stickler for having periods at the end of bibliographical references, just like in journal articles, so people who wish to humor me can write things like:

    Biological classification, Wikipedia.

    instead of

    Biological classification, Wikipedia

    I know it's not a sentence but the period makes my eye feel it's done reading that bit.

    Minutiae, I know — much better that people contribute stuff than not do it because they're worrying about such petty details. But since I'm doing most of the writing so far, I feel it can't hurt to say what my "standard style" is.

    Comment Source:Thanks for noting those problems, David. One link I fixed and one I got rid of &mdash; seems to require a password. Thanks, whoever added a Google Books link regarding Colin Tudge's _The Variety of Life_. I think saying just "Link" is a bit vague. Though we do that now in the [[recommended reading]], I don't recommend it. I changed it to a link like this: * Colin Tudge, _The Variety of Life_, Oxford U. Press, Oxford, 2002. [Google Books](http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=YW-2gnuU0L0C&dq=variety+of+life+tudge&source=bl&ots=6HAY-9n9li&sig=ovCk4PrwCj_Xo9k3iTrly9z22hE&hl=en&ei=xvilTM_BIs7HswackOmjCA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&sqi=2&ved=0CCIQ6AEwAQ). <b>We should get more quantitative data on the biodiversity page!</b> And preferably weave it into a readable story. Thanks, Graham, for new pages on [[systematic biology]] and [[taxonomy]]! I'm a bit of a stickler for having periods at the end of bibliographical references, just like in journal articles, so people who wish to humor me can write things like: [Biological classification](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biological_classification), Wikipedia. instead of [Biological classification](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biological_classification), Wikipedia I know it's not a sentence but the period makes my eye feel it's done reading that bit. Minutiae, I know &mdash; much better that people contribute stuff than not do it because they're worrying about such petty details. But since I'm doing most of the writing so far, I feel it can't hurt to say what my "standard style" is.
  • 4.
    edited October 2010
    From the WWF:

    New analysis shows populations of tropical species are plummeting and humanity’s demands on natural resources are sky-rocketing to 50 per cent more than the earth can sustain, reveals the 2010 edition of WWF’s Living Planet Report — the leading survey of the planet’s health.

    The biennial report, produced in collaboration with the Zoological Society of London and the Global Footprint Network, uses the global Living Planet Index as a measure of the health of almost 8,000 populations of more than 2,500 species. The global Index shows a decrease by 30 per cent since 1970, with the tropics hardest hit showing a 60 per cent decline in less than 40 years.

    I wish I knew what this "Living Planet Index" actually measured, so I could understand what a 60 percent decline means! If someone can figure it out, please stick it into the Biodiversity page.

    Comment Source:From the [WWF](http://www.enn.com/wildlife/article/41880): : New analysis shows populations of tropical species are plummeting and humanity’s demands on natural resources are sky-rocketing to 50 per cent more than the earth can sustain, reveals the 2010 edition of WWF’s Living Planet Report — the leading survey of the planet’s health. : The biennial report, produced in collaboration with the Zoological Society of London and the Global Footprint Network, uses the global Living Planet Index as a measure of the health of almost 8,000 populations of more than 2,500 species. The global Index shows a decrease by 30 per cent since 1970, with the tropics hardest hit showing a 60 per cent decline in less than 40 years. I wish I knew what this "Living Planet Index" actually measured, so I could understand what a 60 percent decline means! If someone can figure it out, please stick it into the [[Biodiversity]] page.
  • 5.

    But since I'm doing most of the writing so far, I feel it can't hurt to say what my "standard style" is.

    Completely agree. I don't recommend "Link" either. I can live without full stops

    I'm just about to post a comment on the strategy thread, which is partly about "how to write for the wiki"

    When do you sleep??

    Comment Source:> But since I'm doing most of the writing so far, I feel it can't hurt to say what my "standard style" is. Completely agree. I don't recommend "Link" either. I can live without full stops I'm just about to post a comment on the strategy thread, which is partly about "how to write for the wiki" When do you sleep??
  • 6.
    edited October 2010

    When do you sleep??

    In between writing... right now my wife Lisa is in Hong Kong for a few days, so my usual "braking mechanisms" are not in place. This is just one reason I need her: to keep from running myself into the ground.

    That missing full stop was cruel, cruel. Reminds me of the story where the musician's apprentice snuck out of bed one night and played an unresolved chord sequence on the piano just to make his master get up and finish it off.

    Comment Source:>When do you sleep?? In between writing... right now my wife Lisa is in Hong Kong for a few days, so my usual "braking mechanisms" are not in place. This is just one reason I need her: to keep from running myself into the ground. That missing full stop was cruel, cruel. Reminds me of the story where the musician's apprentice snuck out of bed one night and played an unresolved chord sequence on the piano just to make his master get up and finish it off.
  • 7.

    That missing full stop was cruel, cruel.

    Well, you'd better beware of the Journal of Mathematical Biology. http://www.springer.com/mathematics/mathematical+biology/journal/285

    Their style is no full stops at the end of references, and not even at the end of multi-sentence captions.

    Comment Source:> That missing full stop was cruel, cruel. Well, you'd better beware of the Journal of Mathematical Biology. http://www.springer.com/mathematics/mathematical+biology/journal/285 Their style is no full stops at the end of references, and not even at the end of multi-sentence captions.
  • 8.

    I just came across this announcement of a PLoS site on biodiversity, launched this month.

    http://blogs.plos.org/plos/2010/10/announcing-plos-hubs-biodiversity/

    A couple of quotes:

    Today we are pleased to officially announce the launch of PLoS Hubs: Biodiversity, a new pilot Web site to connect the biodiversity community with relevant open-access research and accelerate progress.

    and

    As examples of the added value that we plan to deliver via PLoS Hubs, we have enriched a total of four articles with additional publicly available information such as a taxonomy hierarchy, species images and descriptions, and maps with specimen overlays (to see the enriched content simply click on the species names listed on the left hand side of the article). All the articles also feature information on the number of Hubs page views, and PLoS articles display their full suite of article-level metrics.

    Comment Source:I just came across this announcement of a PLoS site on biodiversity, launched this month. http://blogs.plos.org/plos/2010/10/announcing-plos-hubs-biodiversity/ A couple of quotes: > Today we are pleased to officially announce the launch of PLoS Hubs: Biodiversity, a new pilot Web site to connect the biodiversity community with relevant open-access research and accelerate progress. and > As examples of the added value that we plan to deliver via PLoS Hubs, we have enriched a total of four articles with additional publicly available information such as a taxonomy hierarchy, species images and descriptions, and maps with specimen overlays (to see the enriched content simply click on the species names listed on the left hand side of the article). All the articles also feature information on the number of Hubs page views, and PLoS articles display their full suite of article-level metrics.
  • 9.

    Cool! I hope you "Azimuthed" it.

    Comment Source:Cool! I hope you "Azimuthed" it.
  • 10.

    I added GloBio 2010 summary and pointers to the report. (globio is funded by unep and of other un unit) scary stuff but i think we can add even more of the issuses of restoration which is in the report

    Comment Source:I added GloBio 2010 summary and pointers to the report. (globio is funded by unep and of other un unit) scary stuff but i think we can add even more of the issuses of restoration which is in the report
  • 11.

    Eric Forgy added a list of many pages in the biodiversity category to the end of

    Biodiversity

    That's exactly what I want for these 'overview pages' devoted to different categories!

    I added a little remark explaining how to see all pages in this category.

    Comment Source:Eric Forgy added a list of many pages in the [biodiversity category](http://www.azimuthproject.org/azimuth/list/biodiversity) to the end of [[Biodiversity]] That's exactly what I want for these 'overview pages' devoted to different categories! I added a little remark explaining how to see _all_ pages in this category.
  • 12.
    edited February 2011

    There's a media report of a paper that claims climate change won't cause more diversity loss than would be expected anyway. It seems to be making distinctions I don't really understand

    media report

    Comment Source:There's a media report of a paper that claims climate change won't cause more diversity loss than would be expected anyway. It seems to be making distinctions I don't really understand [media report](http://arstechnica.com/science/news/2011/02/climate-change-will-not-disrupt-europes-phylogenetic-biodiversity.ars)
  • 13.

    Hi David,

    Their findings, reported in this week’s Nature, indicate that Europe is not facing a large drop in this diversity.

    If I understand it correctly they are talking about the number of different species in Europe instead of the numbers within a species. And that losses of branches due to climate change would appear random, with surviving branches in the close neighbourhood of a lost branch.

    1280 plants, 340 birds, and 140 mammals were included in their analysis.

    They've only looked at a subset of the tree...

    btw:

    so the climate probably can’t be blamed for the declining human birthrate across the continent

    is this a joke? if so, what's supposed to be the point?

    Comment Source:Hi David, > Their findings, reported in this week’s Nature, indicate that Europe is not facing a large drop in this diversity. If I understand it correctly they are talking about the number of different species in Europe instead of the numbers within a species. And that losses of branches due to climate change would appear random, with surviving branches in the close neighbourhood of a lost branch. > 1280 plants, 340 birds, and 140 mammals were included in their analysis. They've only looked at a subset of the tree... btw: > so the climate probably can’t be blamed for the declining human birthrate across the continent is this a joke? if so, what's supposed to be the point?
  • 14.

    New stub, Measures of biodiversity, with one arXiv link so far.

    Comment Source:New stub, [[Measures of biodiversity]], with one arXiv link so far.
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