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Renewable energy in a small remote village

I have written a page called Renewable energy in a small remote village.

This morning a neighbour came to ask me how much money I was willing to donate to a local project. Somebody, it seems, must fund the 'pre-pre-development costs'. Opinions most welcome.

Comments

  • 1.
    edited October 2011

    If the project failed and the loan was not written off, somebody would have to pay it back. This makes people nervous.

    Try to sell your loan as a toxic investment to some systemic bank?

    Sorry for this digression, but I think it's a shame that when one village wants to invest in its future, it is considered to be the responsibility of the citizens who look into the future, while if some bank goes playing in a casino with the bank accounts of their customers (of course, some of this casino money returns as dividends for the shareholders and as bonusses for the direction board) it ("bad bank" included!) has to be saved by the government because it is 'systemic', the national debt rises significantly, as does the interest rate at which the goverment of the country can get loans etc.

    But I think it's a very interesting page and I'm sorry I don't have any decent comments.

    Somebody, it seems, must fund the 'pre-pre-development costs'.

    might it be possible to ask subsidies for this by the national government or maybe the EU? (I don't mind to pay taxes to subsidize this kind of initiatives) But maybe in this case there are pre-pre-pre-development costs to find your way through the procedure to get subsidies...

    Comment Source:> If the project failed and the loan was not written off, somebody would have to pay it back. This makes people nervous. Try to sell your loan as a toxic investment to some systemic bank? Sorry for this digression, but I think it's a shame that when one village wants to invest in its future, it is considered to be the responsibility of the citizens who look into the future, while if some bank goes playing in a casino with the bank accounts of their customers (of course, some of this casino money returns as dividends for the shareholders and as bonusses for the direction board) it ("bad bank" included!) has to be saved by the government because it is 'systemic', the national debt rises significantly, as does the interest rate at which the goverment of the country can get loans etc. But I think it's a very interesting page and I'm sorry I don't have any decent comments. > Somebody, it seems, must fund the 'pre-pre-development costs'. might it be possible to ask subsidies for this by the national government or maybe the EU? (I don't mind to pay taxes to subsidize this kind of initiatives) But maybe in this case there are pre-pre-pre-development costs to find your way through the procedure to get subsidies...
  • 2.

    Thanks for the moral support, Frederik!

    Comment Source:Thanks for the moral support, Frederik!
  • 3.

    I've googled a little bit and there is some information on EU funding:

    I haven't read it through, but it's quite easy to find out whom already received something, e.g. in the Scottish Highlands within the regional development fund

    It might be possible to ask for a microloan? Your village is in a remote area and you have a green initiative.

    Comment Source:I've googled a little bit and there is some information on EU funding: * [Public contracts and funding](http://ec.europa.eu/contracts_grants/index_en.htm) I haven't read it through, but it's quite easy to find out whom already received something, e.g. [in the Scottish Highlands within the regional development fund](http://www.hipp.org.uk/projectapprovals-erdf.asp) It might be possible to ask for a microloan? Your village is in a remote area and you have a green initiative.
  • 4.

    I tried to do something (though in a far less organised way) here in the west of Ireland with wave energy. In the end, my ideas (admittedly half-cooked - though I'd approached a Scottish company, WaveBob, and they'd shown a lot of interest - I had no money and couldn't bring anyone over and had no support...) were shelved by the development organisation I approached (this in 2002) and in around 2005, coincidentally, a government-funded project (SEAI - the Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland) - began to look into starting up a pilot programme for testing the viability of wave energy conversion devices in a stretch of water just off the coast (they currently have two data collectors, one about a mile, and the other about three miles offshore). My initial motivation was spurred on by the development of the Corrib Gas project which seemed to be ill-conceived and certainly ill-executed, was highly divisive of the community, showed little interest in developing a parallel renewables pilot project, and generally walked all over the protesters, who became, unfortunately, rather controlled by increasingly fundamentalist (for which, read, IRA) elements and other external ideologues. The long and the short of it is that the SEAI project is now on hold. I think they may get going again this year, but that project won't benefit the local community. G. Jones' idea, however, is easily replicable here. In fact, we have a lot of wind here too - most of the time. The big problem with renewables is their unreliability - and we get storm force winds at least 4-5 times a year (and rising? Too hard to predict). So there are times when it becomes impossible to 'capture' the energy - too much or too little. I still think that this sort of project is how to build resilience into communities. Erris is an area of about 850km2, with a human population of around 10,000. I'd need help doing the maths but I'd guess the energy use here would be on a par with that in the north of Scotland - it's more temperate here but there's less infrastructure, and there's less centralisation (nearly all one-off housing) so that pushes usage up. Any ideas on this would be most welcome. Incidentally, I'm British which is not necessarily a disadvantage but definitely makes me what they call a 'blow in' here, and that can make things awkward when making suggestions.

    Comment Source:I tried to do something (though in a far less organised way) here in the west of Ireland with wave energy. In the end, my ideas (admittedly half-cooked - though I'd approached a Scottish company, WaveBob, and they'd shown a lot of interest - I had no money and couldn't bring anyone over and had no support...) were shelved by the development organisation I approached (this in 2002) and in around 2005, coincidentally, a government-funded project (SEAI - the Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland) - began to look into starting up a pilot programme for testing the viability of wave energy conversion devices in a stretch of water just off the coast (they currently have two data collectors, one about a mile, and the other about three miles offshore). My initial motivation was spurred on by the development of the Corrib Gas project which seemed to be ill-conceived and certainly ill-executed, was highly divisive of the community, showed little interest in developing a parallel renewables pilot project, and generally walked all over the protesters, who became, unfortunately, rather controlled by increasingly fundamentalist (for which, read, IRA) elements and other external ideologues. The long and the short of it is that the SEAI project is now on hold. I think they may get going again this year, but that project won't benefit the local community. G. Jones' idea, however, is easily replicable here. In fact, we have a lot of wind here too - most of the time. The big problem with renewables is their unreliability - and we get storm force winds at least 4-5 times a year (and rising? Too hard to predict). So there are times when it becomes impossible to 'capture' the energy - too much or too little. I still think that this sort of project is how to build resilience into communities. Erris is an area of about 850km2, with a human population of around 10,000. I'd need help doing the maths but I'd guess the energy use here would be on a par with that in the north of Scotland - it's more temperate here but there's less infrastructure, and there's less centralisation (nearly all one-off housing) so that pushes usage up. Any ideas on this would be most welcome. Incidentally, I'm British which is not necessarily a disadvantage but definitely makes me what they call a 'blow in' here, and that can make things awkward when making suggestions.
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