Options

Not being here

Just had the idea of such a thread for a different forum - so I returned (after me dunno how many weeks) to the canonical place of internet academy building...


Didn't look much around - the google bot talk thing already seems too mind-blowing. (Which reminds me of my old technical dreams of internets academies - perhaps google could implement the WWW file-ontology tree (actually a clickable Feynman diagram) ...)

So luckily that job is gone, which turned out a hard job... One excuse of not having been here. (Oh, and then John's question on positivity preserving semigroups blew my mind. Which took me some time off for anastasis with anastasia.)

So now I could anyhow look for a hard but well-payed job as programmer. Or better try my super-underpayed math teacher dream job before I get too old for them Tsherman brain managerz - and live in a carbon negative tipi near Munich? Occupying the first anthopogenicly carbon negative ground on Terra Cognita? (Well, depends on the carbon footprint of the solar panel...)

The job thing isn't excuse enough for Not Being Here... I'm still fumbling at my potentially revolutionary paper on basic Riemannian geometric calculus. (Which currently makes me halluzinate of Torsion Gravity - while my Bianchi in Gisser calculus are still not polished. Have decided to introduce two symbolicly distinct covariant derivatives for Tens resp. Hom. -- the Revenge of Florifulgurator, perhaps, but I just can't help doing this.) And there is this follow-up I dream of, ... Gravity theory on path space? Spacetime Hilbertified? (Which reminds me I should ask for a book on locally ringed spaces with infinite dimensional vector bundles.)

OK, seems I'm running out of excuses now.

I'm well aware of undone homework here:

  • Continue Gaia wiki article
  • Delete Experiments in Kato's inequality (papers filed and stuffed in my anti-alzheimer treasure box)
  • Check/update font installation HowTo
  • Comment on Revolutions That Made the Earth (Lenton & Watson). Language and/or Fire

Comments

  • 1.

    Come back and help us out!

    By the way: your English seems much more German in this latest post - it's even hard to understand sometimes. I think you're not talking to us enough.

    Comment Source:Come back and help us out! By the way: your English seems much more German in this latest post - it's even hard to understand sometimes. I think you're not talking to us enough.
  • 2.
    edited January 2012

    I'll try harder.

    Like most Barvarians I'm no language genius :-) Usually I speak German/Barvarian and write English. But now I had to start writing serious German texts (job application narratives) for the first time in years. What an excruciating pain.

    Comment Source:I'll try harder. Like most Barvarians I'm no language genius :-) Usually I speak German/Barvarian and write English. But now I had to start writing serious German texts (job application narratives) for the first time in years. What an excruciating pain.
  • 3.

    Most Americans are language idiots - and certainly that includes me!

    Comment Source:Most Americans are language idiots - and certainly that includes me!
  • 4.
    edited July 2012

    Not being here again...

    I got a new job since June. It's at the grid department at the Bavarian sub-headquarters of a major German energy company. It's quite an athletic job: I need to get up ridiculously early, have a coffee with some sugar and then do the electricity demand prognosis until 9 am. After that I enjoy a cigarette and breakfast.

    First I hoped the job might have some connection to the network theory series here. But nope. Instead I had halluzinations of infinite dimensional Kalman filters. Meanwhile I'm thinking of Gaussian process machine learning. But actually it seems I can beat the prognosis quality of our 2 neural networks and 1 Kalman filter: Simply choose time series of similar days of last year, do a weighted average and subtract the mysterious trend. The whole thing could perhaps be automated with microsofty Excel and Visual Basic.

    The other part of my job is helping with the grid accounting bureaucracy, which is extremely complex. Memory demanding stuff my mind was not made/trained to do. E.g. there's several pages of 3-letter acronyms for all kinds of time series.

    But it's fascinating. We Germans are world masters in quick PV solar and biomass energy build up - and that's a paradigm shifting challenge for the electricty grid.

    Plus, it's the first time I'm allowed non-grotesque non-counterproductive work conditions with non-neurotic colleagues. (That crticism includes my grotesque German university work place of last century.)

    I'm still struggling with switching from night hawk to early bird. That's one reason why I don't have Internets at my new home...

    But I'll be really back one day.

    Comment Source:Not being here again... I got a new job since June. It's at the grid department at the Bavarian sub-headquarters of a major German energy company. It's quite an athletic job: I need to get up ridiculously early, have a coffee with some sugar and then do the electricity demand prognosis until 9 am. After that I enjoy a cigarette and breakfast. First I hoped the job might have some connection to the network theory series here. But nope. Instead I had halluzinations of infinite dimensional Kalman filters. Meanwhile I'm thinking of Gaussian process machine learning. But actually it seems I can beat the prognosis quality of our 2 neural networks and 1 Kalman filter: Simply choose time series of similar days of last year, do a weighted average and subtract the mysterious trend. The whole thing could perhaps be automated with microsofty Excel and Visual Basic. The other part of my job is helping with the grid accounting bureaucracy, which is extremely complex. Memory demanding stuff my mind was not made/trained to do. E.g. there's several pages of 3-letter acronyms for all kinds of time series. But it's fascinating. We Germans are world masters in quick PV solar and biomass energy build up - and that's a paradigm shifting challenge for the electricty grid. Plus, it's the first time I'm allowed non-grotesque non-counterproductive work conditions with non-neurotic colleagues. (That crticism includes my grotesque German university work place of last century.) I'm still struggling with switching from night hawk to early bird. That's one reason why I don't have Internets at my new home... But I'll be really back one day.
  • 5.

    Great to see you again, if only for a short while. It sounds like you're doing great stuff!

    If you ever want to write a post for the Azimuth Blog about your job - with an emphasis on how "quick PV solar and biomass energy build up" are a "paradigm shifting challenge for the electricty grid - that would be great! It could be short, if you wanted.

    Comment Source:Great to see you again, if only for a short while. It sounds like you're doing great stuff! If you ever want to write a post for the Azimuth Blog about your job - with an emphasis on how "quick PV solar and biomass energy build up" are a "paradigm shifting challenge for the electricty grid - that would be **great!** It could be short, if you wanted.
  • 6.

    Well,

    1) I haven't cared much about German energy politics until now. There's a lot to learn.

    2) Ceterum censeo: This fancy new energy stuff is 20th century. It's not serious IMHO. Give me carbon negative wood heating systems, then I will take you serious, dear Homo "Sapiens".

    I'm actually thinking of writing something about implications for serious c21st philosophy and ethics (transcending hominid omphaloskepsis), continuing or completing stuff at the Gaia theory entry. I'm thrilled to see John Roe here. He shares some serious thoughts on his blog. (Alas, I regard "the" judeo-christian worldview (Cartesian split) as part of the roots of today's evil, and why almost nobody seriously perceives it. "Buddhism" seems to be more helpful for today's spiritually inclined.)

    Comment Source:Well, 1) I haven't cared much about German energy politics until now. There's a lot to learn. 2) Ceterum censeo: This fancy new energy stuff is 20th century. It's not serious IMHO. Give me carbon negative wood heating systems, then I will take you serious, dear Homo "Sapiens". I'm actually thinking of writing something about implications for serious c21st philosophy and ethics (transcending hominid omphaloskepsis), continuing or completing stuff at the [[Gaia theory]] entry. I'm thrilled to see John Roe here. He shares some serious thoughts on his blog. (Alas, I regard "the" judeo-christian worldview (Cartesian split) as part of the roots of today's evil, and why almost nobody seriously perceives it. "Buddhism" seems to be more helpful for today's spiritually inclined.)
  • 7.

    I haven't cared much about German energy politics until now. There's a lot to learn.

    I find that it's best to write about things while I'm still learning them, because it helps me think about them and my thought processes are probably easier for readers to understand than later, when I've become more of an expert. So don't be shy!

    Comment Source:> I haven't cared much about German energy politics until now. There's a lot to learn. I find that it's best to write about things while I'm still learning them, because it helps me think about them and my thought processes are probably easier for readers to understand than later, when I've become more of an expert. So don't be shy!
  • 8.
    edited July 2012

    Martin wrote:

    This fancy new energy stuff is 20th century. It's not serious IMHO.

    It's not as much as we need, but Germany is still doing better at moving to renewable energy than any other country I know, so you should tell us what's going on there. Look at the first half of 2012 compared to a year ago:

    Wind power, with a share of 9.2%, has gone up 19.5%.

    Biomass, with a share of 5.7%, has gone up 7.5%.

    Photovoltaic solar power, with a share of 5.3%, has gone up 47%.

    Hydropower, with a share of 4.0%, has gone up 25%.

    Comment Source:Martin wrote: > This fancy new energy stuff is 20th century. It's not serious IMHO. It's not as much as we need, but Germany is still doing better at moving to renewable energy than any other country I know, so you should tell us what's going on there. Look at [the first half of 2012 compared to a year ago](http://www.the9billion.com/2012/07/30/26-of-germanys-electricty-came-from-renewables-in-first-half-of-2012/): Wind power, with a share of 9.2%, has gone up 19.5%. Biomass, with a share of 5.7%, has gone up 7.5%. Photovoltaic solar power, with a share of 5.3%, has gone up 47%. Hydropower, with a share of 4.0%, has gone up 25%.
  • 9.
    edited July 2012

    (Umm, well, this change of course is serious - but should have been done last century, and today is no longer sufficient: How can it be renewable on a degrading planet?)

    The picture in your link doesn't show the typical ratio of PV roofs in a Bavarian village: Usually there are only a few roofs without PV. Many farmers build "solar barns" just to have a roof where to put more panels on.

    The problems I encountered at work:

    • Accounting this huge number of customer-producers. -- E.g. I have a "solar" data series containing a night baseload, possibly from mis-accounted biomass electricity generation. -- E.g. here are 100 pages of UML diagrams defining business processes.
    • Predicting the timetable for conventional power generation. This of course hinges on the accuracy and resolution of weather (insolation) prediction. (Currently we just use Munich airport for all of Bavaria, quite suboptimal, but not the only problem.)
    • Grid stability. Soon an emergency switch-off mechanism for PV feed-in needs to be implemented.
    • Adapting bureaucracy to the fast (even retroactive) changing German Renewable Energy Act

    The German Renewable Energy Act might indeed be worth a blog post. Perhaps it is the next German Exportschlager. (Except the U.S. won't take it - it's against neoliberal market ideology.)

    I won't be surprised if nad knew more about all this. Or, why not ask Joe Romm. :-)

    Comment Source:(Umm, well, this change of course is serious - but should have been done last century, and today is no longer sufficient: How can it be renewable on a degrading planet?) The picture in your link doesn't show the typical ratio of PV roofs in a Bavarian village: Usually there are only a _few roofs without_ PV. Many farmers build "solar barns" just to have a roof where to put more panels on. The problems I encountered at work: * _Accounting this huge number of customer-producers_. -- E.g. I have a "solar" data series containing a night baseload, possibly from mis-accounted biomass electricity generation. -- E.g. [here](http://www.bundesnetzagentur.de/DE/DieBundesnetzagentur/Beschlusskammern/BK6/MaBiS%20Bilanzkreisabrechnung/dritte%20Mitteilung/MaBiS_Geschaeftsprozesse.pdf?__blob=publicationFile) are 100 pages of UML diagrams defining business processes. * _Predicting the timetable for conventional power generation_. This of course hinges on the accuracy and resolution of weather (insolation) prediction. (Currently we just use Munich airport for all of Bavaria, quite suboptimal, but not the only problem.) * _Grid stability_. Soon an emergency switch-off mechanism for PV feed-in needs to be implemented. * _Adapting bureaucracy_ to the fast (even retroactive) changing [German Renewable Energy Act](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_Renewable_Energy_Act) The German Renewable Energy Act might indeed be worth a blog post. Perhaps it is the next German Exportschlager. (Except the U.S. won't take it - it's against neoliberal market ideology.) I won't be surprised if [[nad]] knew more about all this. Or, why not ask Joe Romm. :-)
  • 10.

    Martin wrote:

    Umm, well, this change of course is serious - but should have been done last century, and today is no longer sufficient: How can it be renewable on a degrading planet?

    Right, but while you Germans should be trying to do things even better, the rest of us are doing much worse, and could improve by copying some things the Germans are doing.

    E.g. here are 100 pages of UML diagrams defining business processes.

    Interesting! But the mathematician in me was disappointed at how simple these diagrams are: most are just linear chains. No feedback loops! Doesn't look stable.

    (Probably the feedback mechanisms aren't shown.)

    Or, why not ask Joe Romm. :-)

    It would be great to interview him, but of course I'm trying to get you to write some blog articles.

    Maybe I should just blogify your pages on biochar.

    Comment Source:Martin wrote: > Umm, well, this change of course is serious - but should have been done last century, and today is no longer sufficient: How can it be renewable on a degrading planet? Right, but while you Germans should be trying to do things even better, the rest of us are doing much worse, and could improve by copying some things the Germans are doing. > E.g. [here](http://www.bundesnetzagentur.de/DE/DieBundesnetzagentur/Beschlusskammern/BK6/MaBiS%20Bilanzkreisabrechnung/dritte%20Mitteilung/MaBiS_Geschaeftsprozesse.pdf?__blob=publicationFile) are 100 pages of [UML diagrams](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unified_Modeling_Language) defining business processes. Interesting! But the mathematician in me was disappointed at how simple these diagrams are: most are just linear chains. No feedback loops! Doesn't look stable. (Probably the feedback mechanisms aren't shown.) > Or, why not ask Joe Romm. :-) It would be great to interview him, but of course I'm trying to get _you_ to write some blog articles. Maybe I should just blogify your pages on biochar.
  • 11.

    John wrote:

    Interesting! But the mathematician in me was disappointed at how simple these diagrams are: most are just linear chains. No feedback loops! Doesn't look stable.

    I know that's a joke, but it also points to a rather common and hard problem in interdisciplinary work, namely that people project their knowledge to other problem domains. Instead of looking for the kinds of problems that you expect given your background, you rather need to understand what kinds of problems actually are there and need to be addressed ;-)

    Said the analyst to the algebraic-geometer: your topic is so much easier than mine, because you hardly need to integrate or differentiate difficult functions or even estimate their integrals or differentials...

    So the first fallacity is to assume since none of the problems that you know about are there, that there aren't any problems at all and that it is all trivial. The second fallacity is, of course, to believe that the harder a topic is, the more brilliant people working on it obviously are ;-)

    Comment Source:John wrote: <blockquote> <p> Interesting! But the mathematician in me was disappointed at how simple these diagrams are: most are just linear chains. No feedback loops! Doesn't look stable. </p> </blockquote> I know that's a joke, but it also points to a rather common and hard problem in interdisciplinary work, namely that people project their knowledge to other problem domains. Instead of looking for the kinds of problems that you expect given your background, you rather need to understand what kinds of problems actually are there and need to be addressed ;-) Said the analyst to the algebraic-geometer: your topic is so much easier than mine, because you hardly need to integrate or differentiate difficult functions or even estimate their integrals or differentials... So the first fallacity is to assume since none of the problems that you know about are there, that there aren't any problems at all and that it is all trivial. The second fallacity is, of course, to believe that the harder a topic is, the more brilliant people working on it obviously are ;-)
  • 12.

    John wrote:

    Maybe I should just blogify your pages on biochar.

    The "Experiments in Biochar" is O.K. Other pages need update, e.g. on the counter-propaganda offered at Copenhagen, which Monbiot had swallowed.

    Comment Source:John wrote: > Maybe I should just blogify your pages on biochar. The "Experiments in Biochar" is O.K. Other pages need update, e.g. on the counter-propaganda offered at Copenhagen, which Monbiot had swallowed.
  • 13.

    Well, "Experiments in Biochar" should be updated, too, with the latest prices of heating oil and wood pellets. For updating the other biochar pages I'd need to get some books back. Not this weekend, alas.

    Anyhow for me the blog offers more than enough yummy stuff in way too short time. Often it's a pity that an interesting article gets quickly superseded by another interesting article.

    Comment Source:Well, "Experiments in Biochar" should be updated, too, with the latest prices of heating oil and wood pellets. For updating the other biochar pages I'd need to get some books back. Not this weekend, alas. Anyhow for me the blog offers more than enough yummy stuff in way too short time. Often it's a pity that an interesting article gets quickly superseded by another interesting article.
  • 14.

    Often it's a pity that an interesting article gets quickly superseded by another interesting article.

    I don't consider the older articles 'superseded'; I like to have conversations on each one going on for long periods of time. I get some really good comments on articles that are years old. But perhaps I should slow down my posting now and just save up articles for this fall, when I'll return to teaching and my time for writing blog articles will drop like a rock.

    Comment Source:> Often it's a pity that an interesting article gets quickly superseded by another interesting article. I don't consider the older articles 'superseded'; I like to have conversations on each one going on for long periods of time. I get some really good comments on articles that are years old. But perhaps I should slow down my posting now and just save up articles for this fall, when I'll return to teaching and my time for writing blog articles will drop like a rock.
Sign In or Register to comment.