Comments

  • 1.
    edited January 2012

    Added famous 2005 study on soil carbon loss in England and Wales. There's more worrying studies like this out there, and more recent.

    Comment Source:Added famous 2005 study on soil carbon loss in England and Wales. There's more worrying studies like this out there, and more recent.
  • 2.

    good :-)

    Comment Source:good :-)
  • 3.
    edited March 2013

    Celebrating my first gardening day tomorrow (but there's still snow around):

    Added references to important books by Bardgett and Wardle plus excerpts from back covers. Everybody fascinated by soil should have them.

    P.S.: Oh, they have both teamed together for another book.

    Comment Source:Celebrating my first gardening day tomorrow (but there's still snow around): Added references to important books by Bardgett and Wardle plus excerpts from back covers. Everybody fascinated by soil should have them. P.S.: Oh, they have both teamed together for another book.
  • 4.
    edited March 2013

    The quoted wikipedia "definition" is a bit crass, yet classical, as it misses completely the importance of soil life. No soil life, no soil!

    Added a better quote from Bardgett's book.

    The wikipedia quote talking of rock weathering as if it were a purely physical process also needs some improvement. Wrrrr, the wikipedia stuff sounds like 19th century.

    But I've run out of time for the next days.

    P.S. I should go sleep, yet couldn't resist to also mention Charles Darwin's last book on worms.

    Comment Source:The quoted wikipedia "definition" is a bit crass, yet classical, as it misses completely the importance of soil life. No soil life, no soil! Added a better quote from Bardgett's book. The wikipedia quote talking of rock weathering as if it were a purely physical process also needs some improvement. Wrrrr, the wikipedia stuff sounds like 19th century. But I've run out of time for the next days. P.S. I should go sleep, yet couldn't resist to also mention Charles Darwin's last book on worms.
  • 5.
    Comment Source:Martin did you see this report: <a href="http://phys.org/news/2013-02-global-worming-earthworms-climate.html">http://phys.org/news/2013-02-global-worming-earthworms-climate.html</a> ?
  • 6.
    edited March 2013

    nad, I had a short look at the article. (Actually I should run to meet my real worms before it gets dark.) It's just a meta study, and I strongly suspect it is worthless: Soil can not be studied alone, there's always interaction between aboveground and belowground life. E.g. worms drag plant litter into their burrows, let it rot a little, then munch the goo (plus lots of dirt), and the resulting worm droppings gives excellent new soil. As long as soil accumulates that way or is at least balanced, I don't see how worms contribute to CO2 emissions.

    BTW, I'm experimenting with char coal worm compost. The worm population that stabilized over the last 2-3 years seems quite different to what you would meet in usual compost, with lots of enchytraeids at the younger char coal. They seem to be an amplifying feedback on acidity. Folks call me crazy, but they are fascinating animals. E.g. one sort enchytraeid lives on glaciers: Ice worms die (dissolve) when it gets warmer than 5°C.

    Comment Source:nad, I had a short look at the article. (Actually I should run to meet my real worms before it gets dark.) It's just a meta study, and I strongly suspect it is worthless: Soil can not be studied alone, there's always interaction between aboveground and belowground life. E.g. worms drag plant litter into their burrows, let it rot a little, then munch the goo (plus lots of dirt), and the resulting worm droppings gives excellent new soil. As long as soil accumulates that way or is at least balanced, I don't see how worms contribute to CO2 emissions. BTW, I'm experimenting with char coal worm compost. The worm population that stabilized over the last 2-3 years seems quite different to what you would meet in usual compost, with lots of enchytraeids at the younger char coal. They seem to be an amplifying feedback on acidity. Folks call me crazy, but they are fascinating animals. E.g. one sort enchytraeid lives on glaciers: [Ice worms](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mesenchytraeus) die (dissolve) when it gets warmer than 5°C.
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