My path has been to treat ENSO as a standalone behavior, driven by the massive inertia of the Pacific Ocean. What set me in this direction was the number of references to *sloshing* of the ocean waters, but very few discussions of the dynamics of this behavior. Sloshing is a well-accepted technical term in the hydrodynamics literature, but has only been used as a hand-wavy explanation for ENSO. [This page](http://contextearth.com/sloshing-quotes/) I put together contains many of the layman explanations of ENSO, all of which use the term sloshing to describe the behavior.

By the same token, it is rare to find research that applies the quasi-periodic oscillations in sea-level as an index for ENSO. This is a direct measure of sloshing, so I assume the connection, both theoretically and empirically, to ENSO is not widely known.

So my plan is to continue to search for patterns in climate measures that show the mathematical signature of sloshing. These are the forum threads that I have started -- either dealing with sloshing, pertinent climate measures, or possible ENSO forcings:

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and this recent Questions thread that I am partly hijacking

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Before squatting on Azimuth, I posted more half-baked ideas on the [Context/Earth](http://ContextEarth.com) blog, and continue to use that to summarize progress. [This page](http://contextearth.com/2014/09/13/azimuth-project-on-el-ninos/) I wrote to advertise what we are trying to do with the Azimuth El Nino predition project -- that was my own interpretation of the different directions that people were going in, and so when reading it remember that YMMV.