27 February 2017:

Four pieces of news:

1) Brendan and Brandon made all the required changes to their paper "Corelations are the prop for extraspecial commutative Frobenius monoids", so this paper has now been published by Theory and Applications of Categories. You can see it here:

[http://www.tac.mta.ca/tac/index.html#vol32](http://www.tac.mta.ca/tac/index.html#vol32)

It's in the same issue as two papers by Voevodsky, inventor of homotopy type theory, along with papers by Clemens Berger, Michael Batanin and Jiri Adamek — all famous category theorists! So, congratulations!

2) Blake applied to give a talk on his work at the American Physical Society March Meeting in New Orleans on March 13-17. They asked him to present a poster. He applied to the Grad Student Association for funding to go on this trip, but it looks like he'll have to foot some of the bill himself. (Sadly, while the Metron project he and I are working on pays him enough money so he doesn't have to be a teaching assistant, it doesn't give us any travel money, and the Grad Student Association gives rather limited funds.)

3) Blake has also gotten an invitation from the famous information theorist [Jim Crutchfield](http://csc.ucdavis.edu/~chaos/) to speak about our work at U. C. Davis. I mentioned this earlier, but now it's really come true! I forget when Blake is going up there.

4) Not exactly academic, but: the Azimuth Climate Data Backup Project's [Kickstarter campaign](https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/592742410/azimuth-climate-data-backup-project) has succeeded! Our original goal was $5000. We got $20,427 of donations, and after Kickstarter took its cut we received $18,590.96. I wrote thank-you notes to all 627 contributors, and compiled [a list thanking everyone who was okay with having their name made public](https://johncarlosbaez.wordpress.com/2017/02/18/azimuth-backup-project-part-4/).

We are close to reaching our goal of backing up 40 terabytes of data. The next step will be to put copies in several secure locations. 3 places have volunteered to hold copies: the Princeton math department, a UNESCO center in France, and the U. C. Riverside department of computing and communications. It will take a while to accomplish these transfers.

It looks like I'll be interviewed about this tomorrow by [Amy Harmon](https://www.nytimes.com/by/amy-harmon) of the _New York Times_. But reporters are often busy and distracted, so I'll believe it when it happens.