Thanks for the comments, Evan and John. Brendan and David's seminar is an informal group that meets every week. It's mostly been one of them presenting other people's work or (less often) their own work - think of it as an expanded journal club. [You can see my response to one of the seminars here](https://categoricalmodeling.wordpress.com/2018/02/22/categorical-modeling/).

Some quick further thoughts:

1. Category Theory in Cognitive Science has a longish but mostly neglected history - [Michael Arbib](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_A._Arbib) wrote a book on [Category Theory](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_A._Arbib) which is perhaps the first for a neuroscientist. Then there's the book edited by McNamara and Reyes on the [Logical Foundations of Cognition](https://books.google.com/books?id=Outqx9VKqIMC&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false), but with quite a bit of category theory in it. There aren't that many examples of what John calls "a good solid knowledge of category theory, a good solid knowledge of the intended application, and a lot of time spent figuring out how to connect them"

2. I think what I am trying to get to - purely speculatively for now - isn't a categorical take on logic but a C-theory (think M-theory but with a C) that uses Category Theory to model C-phenomena that may be quite different from logical phenomena. That said, I do have the Elaine Landry edited volume with me and since I have barely started the introduction, I should read the book first.